FUBAR

Can we really achieve a nuclear-free world?

Is a nuke-free world realistic?

President Obama emerged from his two-day summit in Moscow heralding a "reset" of U.S.-Russian relations, with nuclear disarmament at the top of the agenda.

He signed a series of agreements with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev committing to a year-end deal that would cut both countries’ nuclear stockpiles.

Obama has repeatedly said that reducing the two largest nuclear arsenals in the world would both ease tensions between Russia and the United States and also set a good example for other nations.

Why liberals misread GOP sex scandals

Google "Mark Sanford" and "hypocrite" and prepare to sort through some 53,000 results, many from liberal websites reveling in the story of yet another family-values Republican yielding to temptations of the flesh.

But liberal glee at such scandal will be short-lived if the left continues to misjudge conservatives’ reaction to their fallen heroes.

GOP should back off on Sotomayor

Message to GOP: On Sotomayor, give it up.

With Judge Sonia Sotomayor’s Senate confirmation hearings set to begin next week, Republicans are still peering under every pillow in Washington, seeking desperately to uncover controversial issues she has supported and stands she has taken to use against her during those hearings. Most of the media attention on Sotomayor’s record has been on her decision in a civil rights case the Supreme Court recently overturned.

Sarah Palin: America’s best quitter

Because so many in the media will never understand that it’s all about country when it’s all about Sarah Palin, I want to commend the outgoing Alaska governor in the warmest terms.

Certainly, she gave us all a start there when she announced her resignation last week at a backyard news conference, perhaps to a distinguished group of garden gnomes. (A very maverick thing to do).

How we would miss her if she left the national stage! Why, we would have to put a wig on Newt Gingrich to have any hope of hearing anything so stylishly goofy.

Weaknesses found in federal security

Investigators were able to smuggle bomb-making materials past security at 10 federal buildings, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office.

Once GAO investigators got the materials in the buildings, the report said, they constructed explosive devices and carried them around inside. For security reasons, the GAO report did not give the location of the buildings.

Security at these buildings and a total of about 9,000 federal buildings around the country is provided by the Federal Protective Service, a target of the probe.

Racing against the clock on health care

President Barack Obama is struggling to show progress in a race against the clock to revamp the nation’s health care system this year.

Problems in Congress threaten to overshadow a White House event Wednesday designed to boost Obama’s health overhaul.

Leaders from hospital industry trade groups were expected to appear with Vice President Joe Biden to announce that hospitals are ready to give up about $155 billion over 10 years in government payments. The money could then be used to help pay for covering millions of uninsured.

U.S. government web sites attacked

A widespread computer attack that began July 4 knocked out the Web sites of the Treasury Department, the Secret Service and other U.S. government agencies, according to officials inside and outside the government.

Sites in South Korea were also affected, and South Korean intelligence officials believe the attack was carried out by North Korean or pro-Pyongyang forces.

Techies crack Social Security code

For all the concern about identity theft, researchers say there’s a surprisingly easy way for the technology-savvy to figure out the precious nine digits of Americans’ Social Security numbers.

"It’s good that we found it before the bad guys," Alessandro Acquisti of Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh said of the method for predicting the numbers.

Powell: Iraq surge too little too late

Colin Powell says the U.S. took too long to strengthen its forces in Iraq after Baghdad fell early in the war.

Powell, the nation’s top military officer under President George H.W. Bush and secretary of state for President George W. Bush, said the decision to use a lighter force to defeat the Iraqi army was correct. But he said in a television interview broadcast Sunday that the younger Bush’s administration should have realized the initial success in 2003 was only the start of a longer fight.

Our mountain of debt: The real financial crisis

The Founding Fathers left one legacy not celebrated on Independence Day but which affects us all. It’s the national debt.

The country first got into debt to help pay for the Revolutionary War. Growing ever since, the debt stands today at a staggering $11.4 trillion — equivalent to about $37,000 for each and every American. And it’s expanding by over $1 trillion a year.

The mountain of debt easily could become the next full-fledged economic crisis without firm action from Washington, economists of all stripes warn.