FUBAR

Feds threaten to pull out of GM deal

The US government will pull its support from General Motors if the automaker does not get court permission for a speedy exit from bankruptcy protection by July 10, an official testified on Wednesday.

"We cannot make an open-ended commitment," Henry Wilson, a member of President Barack Obama’s automotive task force, told the New York court.

GM is seeking court permission to sell its best assets to a new company in which the US government will get a majority stake.

Sotomayor advised group that opposed Bork

A Puerto Rican civil rights organization advised by Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor campaigned against seating conservative Robert Bork on the high court in the late 1980s, according to new documents that shed light on the group that’s become a key focus of Republicans questioning Sotomayor’s fitness to be a justice.

Mississippi has the most fatties

Mississippi’s still king of cellulite, but an ominous tide is rolling toward the Medicare doctors in neighboring Alabama: obese baby boomers.

It’s time for the nation’s annual obesity rankings and, outside of fairly lean Colorado, there’s little good news. Obesity rates among adults rose in 23 states over the past year and didn’t decline anywhere, says a new report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Pentagon may ease ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ rules

The Pentagon is considering how it might ease the "don’t ask, don’t tell" law requiring gays to keep quiet about their sexual identity or face expulsion from the military, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Tuesday.

"One of the things we’re looking at is, is there flexibility in how we apply this law," Gates told reporters aboard a military plane.

Judge overturns Bush logging rule

A federal judge has struck down the Bush administration’s change to a rule designed to protect the northern spotted owl from logging in national forests.

U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled from Oakland, Calif., on Tuesday that the U.S. Forest Service failed to take a hard look at the environmental impacts of changing the rule to make it easier to cut down forest habitat of species such as the spotted owl and salmon on 193 million acres of national forests.

U.S. withdraws from Iraqi cities; Cheney fumes

Amid fireworks and celebrations, American troops today withdrew from Iraqi cities as part of an agreement timetable that is schduled to have troops out of that embattled country by the end of 2011.

The celebration over the withdrawal of troops was not shared by former Vice President Dick Cheney, who predicted dire consequences as a result of the withdrawal.

When the invasion of Iraq began in 2003, Cheney predicted American troops would be greeted as liberators. That never happened.

But most of Iraq is cheering now.

Discrimination ruling leaves many questions

The Supreme Court ruling in favor of white New Haven firefighters who said they were victims of reverse discrimination will probably leave employers confused, civil rights advocates and labor attorneys say.

The court ruled 5-4 Monday that the white firefighters were denied promotions unfairly because of their race, reversing a decision that high court nominee Sonia Sotomayor endorsed as a federal appeals court judge.

Sotomayor critics cheer court ruling

Foes of Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor celebrated the high court’s reversal of her decision in a reverse discrimination case.

The 5-4 ruling Monday, backing of reverse discrimination claims by white firefighters, is unlikely to derail Sotomayor’s nomination — and it may not even sway a vote. Reaction to the decision fell almost purely along partisan lines, with Republicans cheering the decision and saying it raises serious concerns about the judge, and Democrats condemning the opinion and arguing that Sotomayor had acted appropriately.

Say what? Some teens expect to die young

A surprising number of teenagers — nearly 15 percent — think they’re going to die young, leading many to drug use, suicide attempts and other unsafe behavior, new research suggests.

The study, based on a survey of more than 20,000 kids, challenges conventional wisdom that says teens engage in risky behavior because they think they’re invulnerable to harm. Instead, a sizable number of teens may take chances "because they feel hopeless and figure that not much is at stake," said study author Dr. Iris Borowsky, a researcher at the University of Minnesota.

Congressman’s wife cops a plea

Detroit City Council member Monica Conyers, the wife of powerful and popular Democratic congressman John Conyers, pleaded guilty Friday to accepting cash bribes in exchange for supporting a sludge contract with a Houston company.

Conyers, a political unknown who won her council seat in 2005 largely on her husband’s name, admitted in federal court to a single count of conspiracy to commit bribery, responding quietly to questions from Judge Avern Cohn.

She faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine when she’s sentenced.