Archives for Capitol Hillbillies

‘Good Time Charlie’ Wilson dies at 76

"Good Time Charlie" Wilson, 76, the fun-loving, controversial former congressman from Texas whose clandestine funding of Afghanistan's resistance to the Soviet Union became famous in the movie and book "Charlie Wilson's War," died Wednesday.

Memorial Medical Center-Lufkin in Texas spokeswoman Yana Ogletree said Wilson started having difficulty breathing while attending a meeting in the eastern Texas town where he lived and was pronounced dead on arrival.

The preliminary cause of death was cardiopulmonary arrest, she said.

Wilson, who represented the 2nd District in east Texas in the U.S. House from 1973 to 1996, was known in Washington as "Good Time Charlie" for his reputation as a hard-drinking womanizer with a staff of beautiful young women known as "Charlie's Angels." He called former congresswoman Pat Schroeder "Babycakes," and tried -- and failed -- to take a beauty queen with him on a government trip to Afghanistan.

Wilson's efforts to arm Afghan mujahedeen during Afghanistan's war against the Soviet Union in the 1980s became a legend in Washington. As a member of the House Appropriations Committee, Wilson secured money for weapons, plunging the U.S. into a risky venture against the world's other superpower.
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Pennsylvania Rep. John Murtha dead at 77

Rep. John Murtha, the 77-year-old Pennsylvania Congressman who spoke out for veterans but opposed the Iraq war, died Monday of complications from gall bladder surgery.

Elected to Congress in 1974, Murtha was the first Vietnam war veteran elected to Congress and was known as a rare Democratic hawk when it came to military issues.

He also skated around ethical issues through much of his Congressional career, escaping indictment in the Abscam scandal and was recently under srutiny for intervening in the defense department contract process on behalf of campaign contributors, a role he could play as the ranking Democrat on the House subcommittee that overseas Pentagon spending.
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Scott Brown: Independent or lock-step Republican?

Scott BrownIs Scott Brown a "different kind of Republican" as he claims or will his Senate service be just another lockstep member of his political party?

That's the question the junior Senator from Massachusetts faces as the Republican takes the seat long occupied by Democratic political icon Ted Kennedy.

Vioe President Joe Biden issued the oath of office to Brown Thursday, giving Republicans 41 votes in the Senate and ending the veto-proof Democratic lock.

Brown says he is an independent but his first comments after officially becoming a Senator was standard Republican rhetoric, reciting party line attacks against the economic stimulus program.
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Backroom bribes threaten health care ‘reform’

Special legislative favors, especially one designed to secure a Nebraska senator's vote for the embattled health care package, ignited so much public outrage that President Barack Obama is calling them a mistake and House leaders say the bill can't be resurrected unless such sweetheart deals are scrapped.

Obama says Americans were understandably upset by the backroom dealmaking that he called ugly. In a cruel twist, the reaction helped elect a Republican senator in Massachusetts last week, putting the health legislation in peril.

Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, the No. 3 House Democrat, said Tuesday the House may be able to pass the Senate health bill — and salvage Obama's top domestic priority — if the offending items are deleted.

"We've got to get rid of that Nebraska stuff, we've got to get rid of the Louisiana stuff," Clyburn said, referring to provisions inserted to help secure the votes of holdout Democratic senators Ben Nelson of Nebraska and Mary Landrieu of Louisiana.
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Congress slows down, takes breather on health care

Congressional leaders are taking health care legislation off the fast track as rank-and-file Democrats, wary of unhappy midterm election voters, look to President Barack Obama for guidance in his State of the Union address.

House and Senate leaders said Tuesday they need time to determine the best way forward on health care in the wake of last week's special election loss in Massachusetts, which cost Democrats their filibuster-proof Senate majority.

Obama is not expected to offer a specific prescription in Wednesday night's speech, but Democrats want to hear him renew his commitment to the health care overhaul he's spent the past year promoting as his top domestic priority.

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McCain will support Obama’s proposed budget freeze

Sen. John McCain says he will support President Barack Obama's effort to cut federal spending, but that it won't work unless Obama shows a willingness to veto pork-barrel spending.

Amid indications the administration will announce plans this week to cut domestic spending in its budget proposal, McCain said "we need to do so."

But in his appearance on ABC's "Good Morning America," the Arizona Republican said that Obama "has got to veto bills that are laden with pork-barrel spending, earmarks." He also said he's determined to vote against another term for Fed chairman Ben Bernanke, "because I believe he was the captain of the ship when it hit the iceberg. He was there at the casino when all the gambling went on and he didn't do anything about it."

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Senate ain’t buying Obama’s deficit reduction task force

The Senate is likely to reject a White House-backed plan to establish a bipartisan task force to recommend steps to curb the deficit, even as lawmakers digest the news that President Barack Obama wants a three-year freeze in the domestic budgets they control.

Fresh numbers arriving Tuesday morning from the Congressional Budget Office are expected to bring continued bad news on the deficit, keeping the pressure on Obama and congressional Democrats to demonstrate they're serious about taking on the flood of red ink.

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Republicans recruiting strong slate of new candidates

Buoyed by a big Senate win in Massachusetts and gains in Governorships in Virginia and New Jersey, Republicans beat the bushes for new candidates to run for the ever-growing list of competitive seats in the upcoming mid-term elections.

Polls show increasing voter dissatisfaction with the policies of President Barack Obama and the Democratic leadership of Congress and Republicans hope to capitalize on that anger.

GOP strategists see growing opportunities for major gains in both the House and Senate, aided by missteps by Obama and Democratic congressional leaders.

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Clueless Democratic leaders stumble on health care

Democrats, forever oblivious to the will of American voters, continued to try and save their hopelessly-damaged health care non-reform bill Thursday but any hope for a deal is vanishing into the thin air of political stupidity.

Yet the clueless leaders of the party of the jackass persist.

Republicans, embolded by the upset victory in the Massachusetts special election to fill the Senate seat held by Ted Kennedy and polls showing the majority of American people think the bill is a joke, have stepped up their attacks on the bill and Democrats admit privately that they have shot themselves in the foot when it comes to health care and other failings of their Congressional leadership and the faltering agenda of President Barack Obama.
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Democratic nightmare on Capitol Hill: Who’s next?

Democrats on Capitol Hill fear the light at the end of the tunnel is the light from a runaway locomotive called voter anger.

The loss of a Massachusetts Senate seat held for so long by Sen. Ted Kennedy has shaken the party of the jackass to its roots. The same voter backlast that put Democrats into control of Congress in 2006 and Obama into the White House in 2008 has turned against them.

They're the party in power now and things haven't changed in Washington. They've gotten worse.

Voters still want to throw the bastards out. Only now the bastards are Democrats.

So doom and gloom roam the halls of Congress.
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