Archives for Capitol Hillbillies

Freshmen Dems to Obama: ‘Stay the hell away from us’

Freshman Democrats who owe their seats in Congress to the Barack Obama poltical tsunami in 2008 now want to keep the President at arm’s length because they fear his increasing unpopularity and political missteps cold hurt them in the November midterm elections. Many fear alignment with Obama could cost them the election and want to campaign without his endorsement or a presence in his district. “I just think we don’t quite know yet where his popularity is,” Pennsylvania Democrat Kathy Dahlkemper told Congressional Quarterly in a recent interview. Some have already told the White House they don’t want or need
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Republicans win House seat in Obama’s home district

A Honolulu city councilman has defeated two Democrats to give Republicans a midterm election victory in the U.S. congressional district where President Barack Obama grew up. Charles Djou’s win Saturday is the latest triumph for the GOP as it looks to take back control of Congress. And it came as a blow to Democrats who could not rally around a candidate and find away to win a congressional race that should have been a cakewalk. The seat had been held by a Democrat for nearly 20 years and is located where Obama was born and spent most of his childhood.
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Senate passes financial industry overhaul

In a major victory for President Barack Obama, the US Senate has passed the most sweeping overhaul of financial industry rules since the Great Depression of the 1930s. By a 59-39 margin, lawmakers approved Thursday an ambitious effort to curb Wall Street excesses blamed for fueling the 2008 global economic meltdown, amid smoldering voter anger months before November mid-term elections. “To Wall Street, it says: No longer can you recklessly gamble away other people’s money,” Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. “It says to those who game the system: The game is over.” Senate Banking Committee chair Chris Dodd, a
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Warning to incumbents: You got trouble

Go home. Stick to your guns. Keep your nose clean. Distance yourself from Washington, or even better, your own party. That’s the advice political operatives are giving incumbents and establishment-backed candidates after voters delivered a harsh message to insiders Tuesday night: Enough! One Senate incumbent, Arlen Specter, lost his seat in Pennsylvania. A second, Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas, was forced to defend hers in a runoff. And an establishment-backed candidate in Kentucky, Trey Grayson, lost badly to a tea party favorite who said voters don’t want “the same old, same old politicians.” Fingers planted firmly in the wind, Washington incumbents
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Another GOP hypocrite caught in sex scandal

A sexual fling by another “family values” Republican resulted Tuesday in a swift resignation as Rep. Mark Souder admitted dorking a part-time female member of his staff. Souder becomes the third Indiana Congressman to step down this year and the second to leave under an ethical cloud. GOP Rep. Steve Buyer quit under fire over a questionable spending by a foundation he established to fund college scholarship. Rep. Brad Ellsworth is leaving to run for the Senate. Buyer and Ellsworth will finish out their terms but Souder is leaving immediately and a special election will be set for find someone
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Democrats pile on the pork

With so many of their House colleagues in trouble back home, Democrats have pulled out all the stops to pile on the pork while actually working at governing the country as little as possible. The party of the jackass packed 54 self-serving amendments on to a innocuous science competitiveness bill this week before adjourning early and heading back home to campaign. It’s a craven, cynical political ploy that shows Democrats are scared and willing to do anything to save their endangered jobs. The pork is piled on so thick that any attempt at subtlety is lost: $50 million for a
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Now Democrats feel the heat

Four years ago, in the last mid-term elections, Republicans had to face the music with the sexual hijinks of Florida Congressman Mark Foley and his fondness for young male interns. Now the Democrats have a predator of their own and lingering questions over how party leaders handled the bizzare case of New York Congressman Eric Massa and his sexual harassment of male staff members could mean trouble in the voting booth in November. Foley and Massa both left Congress in disgrace. In both cases, leaders of their party tried to look the other way for too long with failed hopes
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The oil spill blame game goes into overdrive

The blame game is in full throttle as Congress begins hearings on the massive oil spill threatening sensitive marshes and marine life along the Gulf Coast. Executives of the three companies involved in the drilling activities that unleashed the environmental crisis are trying to shift responsibility to each other in testimony to be given at separate hearings Tuesday before two Senate committees, even as the cause of the rig explosion and spill has yet to be determined. Lawmakers are expected to ask oil industry giant BP, which operated the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig 40 miles off the Louisiana coast, why
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Jim DeMint: Tea Party hero, GOP problem

Jim DeMint is becoming something of a tea party hero, even a potential conservative kingmaker, a status that is not making the freshman senator many friends among fellow Republicans in Congress. A backbencher known for his eagerness to challenge the Republican establishment, DeMint is becoming one of the most influential voices of the conservative rebellion that’s shaking up GOP primaries. Tapping an anti-incumbent fervor, the South Carolina lawmaker is a coveted — and feared — endorsement, funneling money and grass-roots energy to long-shot candidates who threaten Washington’s GOP favorites. His efforts, highly unusual for a freshman, have upset senators on
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Anti-incumbent mood threatens veteran Democratic congressman

Democratic Rep. Alan Mollohan has delivered for his West Virginia district for nearly three decades — steering millions of dollars in projects that have helped an anemic economy. But such earmarking by a powerful member of the House Appropriations Committee has drawn scrutiny and stirred the anti-Washington fervor coursing through this year’s elections. Suddenly, Mollohan is facing his toughest challenge, his first contested primary since 1998. His rival in Tuesday’s primary is state Sen. Mike Oliverio, who has criticized the agenda of President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. In a state where Republican presidential nominee John McCain
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