Capitol Hillbillies

Massive budget approved

The U.S. Congress on Thursday approved a $2.9 trillion fiscal 2008 budget that funds President George W. Bush's huge defense buildup while also adding money for Democrats' domestic priorities.

The budget, written by Democrats who control both chambers of Congress, received no backing from House Republicans, while only two moderate Republicans in the Senate supported it.

Senators cut deal on immigration

Leading U.S. senators reached an agreement on Thursday on immigration reform that would strengthen U.S. borders and grant lawful status to millions of illegal immigrants, a deal that could lead to a major legislative victory for President George W. Bush.

Dems want no-confidence vote on Gonzales

Attorney General Gonzels (AP)Support for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales sank further Thursday as Democrats proposed a no-confidence vote, a fifth GOP senator called for his resignation and yet another Republican predicted he won't survive a congressional investigation.

‘Bring us the head of Alberto Gonzales’

Alberto Gonzales
Attorney General Gonzales(AP)

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales is under new political heat after two more Republicans came out against him and Democrats broadened their probe of prosecutor firings to questions of whether he politicized the Justice Department at the White House's behest.

Gonzales, who some believed had survived the furor over the firings, came under new pressure Wednesday when Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., became the fourth Republican senator to urge him to resign. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., also said the attorney general should consider stepping down.

President Bush continued to stand by his longtime friend and adviser.

Let’s make a deal?

Congressional Democrats and President Bush's top aides will enter another round of high-stakes negotiations on funding for the Iraq war in what has become an exhaustive test of wills.

The talks are expected to continue for days, as the each side struggles for the upper hand.

Time to stand up and be counted

Senate Democrats are staging a dramatic anti-war vote this week, with moderates collaborating behind closed doors on legislation that could call on President Bush to rethink his war strategy.

Iraq war vote key for Hillary, Obama

A Senate test vote on Iraq has the makings of a turning point in the Democratic presidential campaign, obliging Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama to take a fresh look at calls for cutting off war funds.

Both have voted against binding timetables for troop withdrawals in the past, before public sentiment against the war hardened or they became presidential contenders.

Will GOP dissent show up in Senate vote on Iraq?

Sen. Harry Reid
Sen. Harry Red (AFP)

The top Democrat in the US Senate Friday staked out the next tussle between Congress and the White House over Iraq, arguing that political sands were shifting against President George W. Bush.

Senator Harry Reid probed anew at signs of cracks in Republican support for Bush's strategy, hours after the House of Representatives defied Bush's veto threat and voted to fund the war in installments of only a few months.

"In just the last few days, we have seen our Republican colleagues tell the president that his war strategy is failing," Reid said on the Senate floor.

"This is a welcome shift. It is encouraging."