Archives for Capitol Hillbillies

Sen. Robert Byrd injured in fall at home

Robert Byrd, the longest serving senator in history, has been taken to a hospital after a fall at home in the Washington suburbs. Spokesman Jesse Jacobs says the 91-year-old West Virginia Democrat apparently stood up too fast and fell and that his caregiver called an ambulance "out of an abundance of caution." He said that Byrd is being examined but that at this point there is no indication that he will be admitted. Byrd has been in frail health in recent years and was hospitalized in May and June with dangerous infections. But he returned to the Senate in July to vote and earlier this month gave his first floor speech in months, where he talked about the passing of Sen. Edward Kennedy.
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Work starts on revising health care bill

Senators challenging the latest proposed health care overhaul already have won concessions that include reducing a penalty for Americans who don't buy insurance, and hundreds of other changes are up for debate as a powerful committee takes up President Barack Obama's top domestic priority. The Senate Finance Committee — the last of five panels to have a say before the full Senate debates legislation — will consider a 10-year, nearly $900 billion plan Tuesday by Chairman Max Baucus. The Montana Democrat has spent months striving for bipartisan common ground. Senators have filed 564 amendments, some of which would make major changes to his carefully crafted framework.
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Congress defers action on road, air bills

The Democratic-led Congress' determination to do something about health care this year has slowed legislation affecting the safety of almost every traveler in America. Barring some miracle, lawmakers acknowledge they don't have the time or the political capital to act on new bills bringing major improvements and more money to those overworked, underfunded infrastructure systems. The House is expected on Wednesday to simply extend existing surface and air transportation programs through the end of the year. The reauthorization of surface transportation and Federal Aviation Administration programs faces roadblocks even without the time-consuming dominance of the health care debate. But both transportation priorities have been directly affected by the health care battle.
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House moves to extend unemployment benefits

Despite predictions the Great Recession is running out of steam, the House is taking up emergency legislation this week to help the millions of Americans who see no immediate end to their economic miseries. A bill offered by Rep. Jim McDermott, D-Wash., and expected to pass easily would provide 13 weeks of extended unemployment benefits for more than 300,000 jobless people who live in states with unemployment rates of at least 8.5 percent and who are scheduled to run out of benefits by the end of September. The 13-week extension would supplement the 26 weeks of benefits most states offer and the federally funded extensions of up to 53 weeks that Congress approved in legislation last year and in the stimulus bill enacted last February.
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Pelosi: Hate could fuel increase in violence

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says hate-filled rhetoric over President Barack Obama's health care reform proposals could fuel a dangerous increase in violence. Pelosi told reporters that the tone of the debate over health care is "frightening" and reminds her of the angry, hate-filed rhetoric over gay rights that emerged in San Francisco in the 1970s and led to the the murders of city Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone. Pelosi said those spewing the hate rhetoric will be responsible for any "incitement" they results from the tone of the debate.
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Senators target Bush’s abuses

A group of US Senators unveiled legislation Thursday aiming to strip telecommunications firms that took part in a hugely controversial Bush-era spying program of immunity from lawsuits. The bill aims to "fix problems with surveillance laws that threaten the rights and liberties of American citizens" without crippling the government's ability to track suspected terrorists, the lawmakers said in a joint statement. The legislation would affect the way the US government can search Americans' personal records, conduct wiretapping, and otherwise collect and use information on US citizens.
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Dems pissed over tax hike in health care bill

Unhappy Senate Democrats on Thursday found plenty to complain about in the fine print of the latest health overhaul bill, particularly a tax provision they fear would hit hard at middle-class Americans, from coal miners in West Virginia to firefighters in New York. The opposition sprang up a day after Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus, D-Mont., unveiled long-delayed legislation that would transform the nation's health care system, requiring almost everyone to buy insurance, making insurance companies cover people with pre-existing medical conditions and reining in spiraling health care costs. The bill has given fresh momentum to President Barack Obama's top domestic priority of extending health coverage and controlling costs.
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Democrats unhappy with Baucus

President Barack Obama's call for an overhaul of the nation's health care system gained fresh momentum with the introduction of long-delayed Senate legislation to rein in spiraling medical costs and require nearly everyone to be carry health insurance. The proposal by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus "will move this historic debate forward," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, although she quickly added that Baucus' plan was less desirable than a bill taking shape in the House. Other Democrats were less enthusiastic, and not a single Republican announced support when Baucus introduced the measure Wednesday after months of closed-door talks and numerous missed deadlines.
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Lobbyists love Baucus’s bill

The latest health overhaul plan circulating on Capitol Hill gives health insurers, drug makers and large employers reasons to heave sighs of relief, sparing them the higher costs and more burdensome rules included in other Democratic-written alternatives. Industry players that have already struck bargains with President Barack Obama's administration and leading Democrats to help pay for revamping the health system saw most of those deals left intact — and in some cases sweetened — in the $856 billion proposal unveiled Wednesday by Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., the Finance Committee chairman.
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I’m a woman, hear me spend

There used to be a water-cooler line the gist of which was that women had to work twice as hard as men to get half as far in the workplace. Peggy Lee sang the song, "I'm a Woman" including the lyrics, "I can bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan." Even though both have become ossified cliches because women have proven themselves over and over, a new study seems to prove women are still overachieving, this time in Congress. A study released this week by researchers at Stanford University and the University of Chicago says that, on average, women in Congress whip up more bills than their male counterparts, arm-twist more members of their own party and the opposition to co-sponsor these bills and (here comes the song allusion) bring back more federal pork to their constituents than their male counterparts.
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