Comments

  1. D

    I don’t trust the irs and government because the are not required to prove anything they say.

  2. NancyinStL

    Having worked with computers since the mid-60’s, I assure you that hard drives do crash. Some are not recoverable. (I’ve seen hard drives that had severe head crashes that were grooved down to bare metal. No oxide = no data.)

    Backup tapes do get recycled, or else there would be a huge number of controlled-environment buildings required to store all the tapes.

    Not only that, there would be a huge staff devoted to maintaining the tapes. The tapes need to be rewound periodically to prevent data signal print-through to other layers of the tape – making them unreadable. Besides, eventually the binder that holds the oxide (where the data is recorded) on the tape fails over time.

    • Yes, hard drives do crash. But the IRS is claiming they stored the email on her desktop, which goes against all government IT protocol and the record retention law, and that the private company they used to backup the email also lost the data. The odds of this occurring are very slim, unless one has something to hide.

      • NancyinStL

        “But the IRS is claiming they stored the email on her desktop, which goes against all government IT protocol and the record retention law”

        They limited on-line (server) e-mail storage to 10 GB. All employees kept older e-mails on their hard drives. (I did the same thing when I was working for corporations.)

        As to the Federal retention requirements:

        [For electronic information systems agencies should “establish fixed procedures for generating backup copies of their systems or the data (records) contained in the system and for recycling the backup tapes or disks”.]

        http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/publications/agency-recordkeeping-requirements.html#b

        Looks like the IRS had the procedures in place.

        “the private company they used to backup the email also lost the data.”

        The private company didn’t “lose” the data. They recycled the tapes after 6 months, which is their procedure. (Many large corporations also do this.) Since this happened in 2011 and it’s now 2014, it’s not surprising that the private company doesn’t have the data anymore.

  3. Jon

    In short, Ms. InStl, would you say that the upshot is entirely reasonable, and we’re having a witch hunt here?

    It’s not quite the ‘accidental deletion’ of eighteen minutes of tape that, when the stenographer in question was called upon to repeat the ‘accident’, she was entirely unable to reach across the office to do so…

    Not that ordinary facts will ever get in the way of a witch hunt.

    J.

    • NancyinStL

      Its either a “witch hunt” or creating a lot of noise to get the base riled up.

      • Jon

        One could easily argue those two things are exactly the same. No ‘witch trial’ takes place in a vacuum.

        J.