Kerry to Snowden: ‘Man up and come home’

'If Mr. Snowden wants to come back to the United States, we'll have him on a flight today'

Edward Snowden (The Guardian/London)

Edward Snowden (The Guardian/London)

Secretary of State John Kerry says National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden “should man up and come back to the United States.”

Kerry was asked about Snowden in a nationally broadcast interview Wednesday in the wake of Snowden’s interview earlier with NBC News. In that session, Snowden said he never intended to end up Russia, but was forced to go there because Washington decided to “revoke my passport.”

Asked about this on NBC “Today” show Wednesday, Kerry replied, “Well, for a supposedly smart guy, that’s a pretty dumb answer.”

Kerry said, quote, “If Mr. Snowden wants to come back to the United States, we’ll have him on a flight today.”

He said Snowden should “stand up in the United States and make his case to the American people.”

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13 Responses to "Kerry to Snowden: ‘Man up and come home’"

  1. Bill Cravener  May 28, 2014 at 8:45 am

    Snowden now admits that he is in fact a trained spy. This little dreeb needs to be hung by his scrawny neck until his eyes pop out of his head. I don’t see that as too brutal for such a traitorous coward as he!

    • Pablo  May 30, 2014 at 5:14 am

      Of course he’s a “trained spy”, WE trained him! Traitorous coward? It’s been a long time since this country has seen as brave a patriot as Snowden. The traitors are those that directed the NSA to violate the Constitution, and those that willfully continued to allow it.

      • Bill Cravener  May 30, 2014 at 6:24 am

        Snowden a Patriot? How absurd! How naïve!

        A Patriot would not run like a coward to the open arms of our enemies. A Patriot would not carry a boat-load of U.S. intelligence data, exposing methods and capabilities, to China and Russia. Data which had nothing to do with his Fourth Amendment concerns.

        This puke Snowden is a traitorous, grandiose, narcissistic coward who deserves to be hung by his scrawny neck until dead!

        • Pablo  May 30, 2014 at 7:04 am

          Piffle. If he had tried releasing any of that info while still in the US, he’d have simply been quickly locked up, delayed and forgotten about. Or more likely, anonymously packed away to Guantanamo under some legally-half-assed justification. He left the country simply because it was the only way that he’d be able to remain free and speak about it. He’d have been a complete idiot not to.

          And I agree with you, my belief that our elected officials ought to be standing up and demanding that the Constitution be upheld in accordance to the oaths they swore (i.e., that they do the right thing) is incredibly naive.

          Snowden tried to do the right thing through the “proper channels” and was told to shut up. Being a patriot, he’s now put everything he has at risk to bring these transgressions to light.

  2. Dave  May 28, 2014 at 8:30 pm

    Kerry is such a douche. He expects Snowden to return and get a fair shake? Better yet, how about the Obama administration owning up to all the illegalities they have done thus far and then they can “Man up.”

  3. SDRSr  May 29, 2014 at 12:02 am

    Dave, how about President GW Bush, Vice President Cheney and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld man up and face criminal charges for their invasion of Iraq? How about they man up and faces charges for conducting a war off the books contributing to crashing the economy. Need I go on?

    As for Mr. Snowden, if he is a “Spy” then he was working for a foreign intelligence service against this country and has committed high crimes against this country. An Agent on the other hand, is also trained and is working for the training country. If he did suffer a crises of conscience, then he can come here and face the music and prove his claim, as many others who suffered a crises of conscience have done. I may believe him, but stealing 1.7 million documents (claimed) sure does not look like a crises it looks like a looting.

    • Dave  May 29, 2014 at 12:23 pm

      I believe Snowden has already proved his claim. The US has spied on its allies, every US citizen, and God knows who else. I believe that most of those who suffered a crisis of conscience and told their tale are now behind bars. I seriously doubt Snowden is going to get a fair shake from anyone in the US government.

      • SDRSr  May 29, 2014 at 7:57 pm

        Need to read the NSAs Charter, they were charged with spying on other nations and and targeted individuals in US territory. Guess who approved the original charter, Congress. I have no problem with the NSA doing what their charter (original) says they are to do.

        From a Wiki article on the NSA “The National Security Agency (NSA) is a U.S. intelligence agency responsible for providing the United States government with encrypted communications (information assurance) and the reading of encrypted communications (signals intelligence) of other nations. The NSA is tasked with the global monitoring, collection, decoding, translation and analysis of information and data for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes, including surveillance of targeted individuals in U.S. territory.” link – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

        The response to a 1990 EFF FOIA request for the original NSA Charter – link https://w2.eff.org/Privacy/Key_escrow/Clipper/nsa.charter

        I do have a problem with the NSA spying on US Citizens with or without a warrant any where in the universe. Guess what congress gave the NSA the authority to do that.

        If you read carefully my response above, I make my position on Mr. Snowden clear. If he had a crises of conscience he should have done what Deep Throat did, instead Mr. Snowden stole 1.7 million (claimed) classified documents, not all of them were about the NSA wiretapping of US Citizens. One million seven hundred thousand classified documents is not crises of conscience but is looting.

  4. Jon  May 29, 2014 at 4:09 am

    I’m still wondering who’s the traitor here. Those who wildly violated the U.S. Constitution, or those who mentioned it.

    J.

  5. SDRSr  May 29, 2014 at 10:50 am

    As Officers of the US; elected and appointed officials are swore to protect, defend and uphold the Constitution. So you tell me who is the “traitor” here. Those who point out that their leaders may have or have violated the law or exceeded their authority; or those who have committed the act?

    Mr. Snowden took an oath to not reveal any classified material he may have worked with or ran across. He received training in the proper procedures if he came across a violation, etc, etc. He ran across something that caused him to question what was going on and if it was right. However, unlike “Deep Throat” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Throat_%28Watergate%29) during the Nixon administration, Mr. Snowden spent months gathering innumerable classified documents of not only the eavesdropping, but many other things then ran because he did not have the courage of his convictions..

    Jon, to me those “Who wildly violated the U.S. Constitution” are the “traitors”.

  6. Jon  May 29, 2014 at 8:01 pm

    One might also ask why George Washington (who took an oath to loyally defend the English crown) didn’t “Man Up” and go back to Britain to face the accusations there.

    Technically, they’re all traitors, but there are differences in degree. Someone who exceeds the speed limit is committing a crime, someone who deliberately kills someone is also committing a crime, but the two criminals are not the same.

    Someone who violates the law to commit crimes (there’s no ‘may have’ here – it’s beyond obvious) and someone who tells the world about it may have both violated the law, but there is a difference in degree.

    Personally, I think Edward Snowden “Manned Up” long ago, when he realized, “This will totally wreck my life, but I’m going to expose it anyhow.”

    I’m sure he was aware of what happened to those who had tried to raise such issues ‘through channels’ and how much their efforts changed anything.

    Finally, the United States Constitution, as currently implemented and interpreted is not the ultimate in truth and beauty. When in the course of human events it becomes necessary to expose an abuse of fundamental human rights, the rights become superior to the rules. Loyalty to country is not the ultimate loyalty.

    I am loyal to my family, my house, and my town. I am loyal to my county, my state, and my country, but over and above that I am a human being. I am loyal to the human race. And, I believe, so is Edward Snowden.

    J.

  7. Rebecca Griffin  May 31, 2014 at 7:31 pm

    There’s a lot to dislike in Kerry’s quote, but I was particularly annoyed that our top diplomat would use such an inane, macho phrase. I wrote about my issues with “man up” here: http://bit.ly/1o1CHQJ

  8. Jon  June 2, 2014 at 1:28 am

    Here’s another bone for an old thread:

    Daniel Ellsberg, famous for the Pentagon Papers during the Nixon regime, pointed out a) that he didn’t get a fair trial and b) Edward Snowden wouldn’t get one either.

    In Mr. Kerry’s speech, he often compared the two. Mr. Ellsberg himself refutes the distinction.

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/30/daniel-ellsberg-snowden-fair-trial-kerry-espionage-act

    Jon

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