1. The Cato brief is funny but it isn’t the same situation. In their examples, the candidates themselves lied about their intentions, their platform statements did not carry through into their administration. The laws bar slander against other candidates, something honest people should support. So of course few if any politicians would support it. There honesty isn’t in questions. We all know they are liars.

  2. Keith

    Regardless of all the hoopla in Ohio, their supposed “law” would never stand up to a Supreme Court ruling.

    Remember the “Stolen Valor Act of 2005” signed into law by President George W. Bush on December 20, 2006?

    That law broadened the provisions of previous U.S. law addressing the unauthorized wear, manufacture, or sale of any military decorations and medals. It made such use a federal misdemeanor to falsely represent oneself as having received any U.S. military decoration or medal. If convicted, defendants might have been imprisoned for up to six months, unless the decoration lied about is the Medal of Honor, in which case imprisonment could have been up to one year.

    However, in United States v. Alvarez the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 28, 2012, that the Stolen Valor Act was an unconstitutional abridgment of the freedom of speech under the First Amendment, striking down the law in a 6 to 3 decision.

    Methinks all the nonsense now being contemplated in Ohio would be doomed to the same fate.