Christie to GOP: Reach out to minorities, women, seniors

After his convincing win on Tuesday, Christie's appeal is rising, especially among Republicans who are fed up with tea party extremism and want to appeal more to mainstream voters.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (AP/Mel Evans)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (AP/Mel Evans)

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, heralded as the “proper face of the Republican Party” after his 22 percent re-election win last week, has a simple message for the GOP:  Walk away from the right-wing extremists, spend more time with women, seniors and minorities plus shut up and listen to voters.

And what about 2016, when Republicans will need a more centrist-focused nominee for President to try and reverse losses in the last two elections?

“I know everybody is going to be speculating about what may come in my future and lots other people’s future in our party,” Christie said on Fox News Sunday, “but the fact is, I am focused on being the governor of New Jersey and being the chairman of the Republican Governor’s Association.  I think those jobs will keep me pretty busy over the next year.”

But what if the party comes calling for him to run for President in 2016?  Will he serve all four years of his second term as New Jersey Governor?

“Listen, who knows?  I don’t know,” he said.

Republicans are searching frantically for something they haven’t had on a national level for the past eight years — a winner.  After his convincing win on Tuesday, Christie’s appeal is rising, especially among Republicans who are fed up with tea party extremism and want to appeal more to mainstream voters.

“I got 61 percent of the vote in the state of New Jersey in a blue state that had just re-elected Barack Obama a year ago by 17 points,” Christie told the right-wing Fox Network.  “That was nearly a 40 percent turnaround between voting for a Democrat at the top of the ticket and voting for a Republican.”

He did it by reaching out and appealing to a lot of demographic groups that traditionally vote for Democrats.

“Getting 51 percent of the Hispanic vote, I’m very proud of that.  Because I’ve worked hard with the Hispanic community to let them see how our polices can help their families,” he said. “I’ve worked hard with the African American community.  I’ve worked hard with seniors and students.”

How did he win?  Better than average showing at the polls with minorities, women, senior citizens and Democrats.

Christie’s win is a sharp contrast to the loss of tea party-backed right wing Republican candidate Ken Cuccinelli against Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Virginia.

Exist polls shows heavy support for McAuliffe from women, African Americans and Hispanics in the swing state.  Political insiders say the vote is a part of a building nationwide shift by the GOP away from the extremes in the tea party.

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