Rabid-right Republicans, as usual, resist long-needed change in hypocritical and bigoted ideas

040113bigotryThe rabid right wing of the Republican Party, less and less of a factor as time marches on without them, is still fighting to prevent the party from moving forward and joining modern times.

“Look, the Republican Party is not going to change,” former Senator and failed Presidential candidate Rick Santorum told Politico recently.  “If we do change we’ll be the Whig Party.  We’re not the Libertarian Party.  We’re the Republican Party.”

Mike Huckabee — another proud member of the Bible-thumping, hard-core religious right — claims the GOP lost the last two Presidential elections not because its candidates were too far fight but says they are too moderate.

Hmmm.  Weren’t tea party darlings Sarah Palin and Paul Ryan on the last two Presidential tickets as vice presidential candidates?

Doesn’t matter, Huckabee claims, saying the presence of John McCain and Mitt Romney at the top of the tickets kept too many conservatives at home.

Both Santorum and Huckabee think the rabid right turning out in force could have made a difference in 2008 and 2012.

If their beliefs are true, then the best thing that could have happened to America was the presence of a Republican moderate that kept the so-called “conservatives” at home and away from the polls.

Here at Capitol Hill Blue, most of us believe that the rabid right represents more of a threat to the American way of life than any turban wearing and Islam-spouting terrorist.

The right wing of the GOP is driven by hate, intolerance and power.  They don’t give a damn about what is good for Amercia — they only want a country fashioned by a government that controls what we say, what we hear and what we can do — especially in the privacy of our bedrooms.

They misquote the Bible, a book of wide-ranging contradictions — as justification of an effort to keep this country in the dark ages.  They claim less government is preferable, unless the government passes binding legislation imposing a hypocritical view of morality on a nation of victims of their perverted view of the world.

Their hypocrisy is astounding.  The rabid right pushes family values, yet Republicans like Newt Gingrich embarked on numerous extra-marital affairs, often ending marriages with former mistresses to united with a new one.  They condemn homosexuality but the party is riddled with closeted gays.

After two election losses, some signs of change have come to the party of the elephant.  The list of Republicans now supporting gay marriage grows almost daily and the party of intolerance and intransigence is close to a deal that will bring a long-needed overhaul of U.S. immigration laws.

Both changes, of course, are viewed with dismay by right-wing addicts like Rick Santorum and Mike Huckabee.  We also still see examples of the old GOP.  Alaska GOP Rep. Don Young proved that this past week when he referred to Hispanics as “wetbacks.”  He apologized after coming under fire from his own party, including Speaker of the House John Boehner, who said:

Congressman Young’s remarks were offensive and beneath the dignity of the office he holds. I don’t care why he said it – there’s no excuse and it warrants an immediate apology.

Of course, neither Santorum or Huckabee joined other Republicans in condemning Young.

Too bad.

The world is changing.

Even the Republican Party is changing.

And troglodytes like Santorum and Hukabee may have no choice but to take their outdated hypocrisy, bigotry and racism back into a cave where such attitudes belong.

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Copyright 2013 Capitol Hill Blue

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11 Responses to "Rabid-right Republicans, as usual, resist long-needed change in hypocritical and bigoted ideas"

  1. Sandy Price  April 1, 2013 at 7:34 am

    Bravo Chief! You have defined exactly why I have run from the Republican Party.

    I have enormous respect for dedicated Christians. I was raised to follow the church’s tenets of treating everyone with respect. The hypocrisy of the LDS forced me to leave the church of my family. The Birch Society showed me that the hypocrisy of division within their members showed me that this Christian movement in America would keep us in a constant state of war with any nation who did not accept Jesus Christ. President Bush 43 proved my point.

    The state of a peaceful mind was not to be mine in a world of division brought on by how many Christians defined their desires.

    I love the Christian music and play it daily hoping I could take in what it offered. When this movement headed for government power, I got annoyed at the audacity of their interpretation.

    You describe exactly why the Tea Party/Conservative interpretation will destroy the GOP. Good Riddance.

  2. bryan mcclellan  April 1, 2013 at 8:53 am

    Most times a bloody nose will deter a bully but the American Tali-Ban right wingers continue to bleed arrogance, whilst fawning ignorance of the fact that the times they truly are a changing, and so continue to ride their high horse in the low valleys of their obvious shame.

  3. Sandy Price  April 1, 2013 at 12:32 pm

    Well put Brysn. I shudder to think I ever associated with any of them. It was the introduction to the social issues that tore all the integrity out of the whole lot.

    I got a note off to Jeff Flake this morning hoping he can stop being a Mormon long enough to be an American.

    I like your use of the word “shame.” My grandmother used that word a lot and we all felt it as a terrible word when it was directed at us.

  4. Jon  April 1, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    Actually, I believe the rabid right does turn out in full force for every election. As it happens, though, there just aren’t that many of them – The noise they make is wildly out of proportion to their numbers, and this is still (most of the time, and in most places) a Democratic Republic.

    J.

  5. Jon  April 1, 2013 at 3:21 pm

    PS – Love your rants, Mr. Thompson, but you too could make use of the ‘preview’ button before posting.

    You may delete this comment when you find the egregiously obvious typo in the 3rd paragraph (So could you, Sandy. I kvetch because I care).

    J.

    • Sandy Price  April 1, 2013 at 4:11 pm

      Leave me out of this J. I read Doug’s comments for what they have to say. He’s the chief! I will comment when he is dead wrong but not for a misspell. My eyes are so old and faulty that everything looks good to me.

      • Jon  April 1, 2013 at 7:41 pm

        The idea is precision. It’s great to be right, but all the knives in the drawer, although sharp, don’t mind a little more sharpening.

        Dr. Isaac Asimov, in an essay called ‘The Relativity of Wrong’, described those who think the Earth is flat as wrong. Those who think the Earth is a sphere are also wrong, but they’re a lot closer to correct than the former.

        It’s an asymmetrical oblate spheroid, for those taking notes. Being close to perfect is desirable, and getting closer more so, even if the ultimate goal is unattainable.

        Again, I point out these things not to be nasty, but to be constructive. To make better.

        J.

        • Sandy Price  April 2, 2013 at 8:31 am

          Dr. Asimov was a successful writer and philosopher.

  6. Jon  April 1, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    I shipped off a fax to a U.S. Representative about their support of another federal Representative who, while advocating outlawing all abortions, was pestering their wife and and their mistress to have abortions (which they both did).

    Such was the ‘one rule for them, another, different, rule for me’ point that I tried to get across.

    Granted, I was being somewhat snarky, and I didn’t expect much answer. My expectations were completely fulfilled – I got no answer. J.

  7. Danny Adams  April 2, 2013 at 4:06 pm

    “They misquote the Bible…They claim less government is preferable…”

    And they justify their beliefs as what the “Founding Fathers intended” by dredging up fake Founding Father quotes they find on the Internet.

    A couple of years or so back somebody in Roanoke even went so far as to pay for a billboard with the phony George Washington God-and-the-Bible-make-the-best-government quote, which is a venerable hoax as such things go since it dates all the way back to the 1930s.

  8. Keith  April 2, 2013 at 7:43 pm

    It would appear that Sinclair Lewis absolutely got it right when he wrote that: “When fascism comes to America, it will come wrapped in the flag and waving a cross,”

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