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Stealth bombers sent to South Korea

By The Associated Press
March 28, 2013

U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber, left, flies over near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 28, 2013. A day after shutting down a key military hotline, Pyongyang instead used indirect communications with Seoul to allow South Koreans to cross the heavily armed border and work at a factory complex that is the last major symbol of inter-Korean cooperation. (AP Photo/Lee Jung-hun, Yonhap)

U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber, left, flies over near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 28, 2013. A day after shutting down a key military hotline, Pyongyang instead used indirect communications with Seoul to allow South Koreans to cross the heavily armed border and work at a factory complex that is the last major symbol of inter-Korean cooperation. (AP Photo/Lee Jung-hun, Yonhap)

The U.S military says two nuclear-capable B-2 bombers have completed a training mission in South Korea amid threats from North Korea that include nuclear strikes on Washington and Seoul.

The statement Thursday by U.S. Forces Korea is an unusual confirmation. It follows an earlier U.S. announcement that nuclear-capable B-52 bombers participated in ongoing U.S.-South Korean military drills.

The U.S. says the B-2 stealth bombers flew from a U.S. air base and dropped munitions on a South Korean island range before returning home.

The announcement will likely draw a strong response from Pyongyang. North Korea sees the military drills as part of a U.S. plot to invade and becomes particularly upset about U.S. nuclear activities in the region.

Washington and Seoul say they the annual drills are routine and defensive.
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Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Copyright 2013 Capitol Hill Blue

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8 Responses to Stealth bombers sent to South Korea

  1. Sandy Price

    March 28, 2013 at 8:55 am

    D.C. plays dangerous games

  2. Jon

    March 28, 2013 at 9:55 pm

    I’m not sure there are any NOT nuclear-capable B-52s (Or B-2s, for that matter). I think even NASA’s old B-52B could carry one. Isn’t that what they were designed for?

    Also, ‘Showing off force’ and using a ‘Stealth’ bomber? Heh.

    I know, the idea is to show munitions arriving, not aircraft, but I still chuckled a bit.

    Finally, now the DPRK doesn’t have much to worry about for awhile:

    “In September 1997, each hour of B-2 flight necessitated 119 hours of maintenance”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_Grumman_B-2_Spirit

    J.

    • Carl Nemo **==

      March 30, 2013 at 4:19 am

      Hi Jon,

      Both the B52H series and the B2 bombers have nuclear air to ground capabilities, each being able to carry 20 variable yield cruise missiles. The yield is adjustable from a 17kt fission wep to a 210 kt tritium boosted fusion device controlled by the pilot based on the mission at hand.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AGM-86

      Both the B52H and the B2 have been most recently utilized in dropping conventional ordnance in a post “Cold War” era.

      In the event Kim Jong-un along with his general staff decide to do something provocative in a nuclear sense towards S. Korea or U.S. based interests you can be assured we shall respond in a like, but infinitely more effective manner.

      The DPRK has a very large army but it’s military machine is a hodge podge array of antiquated hand me downs from the Chinese and possibly the Russians; I.E., their discards.

      Kim and his Generals along with high level government apparatchiks have been living large while their people are on the edge of starvation.
      International sanctions against the nation are beginning to extract a heavy toll on their ‘party hearty’ lifestyle. The pain has been creeping upward.

      Analysts are coming to the conclusion Kim’s actions are that of a regime that’s on the precipice of collapse which makes them potentially dangerous, but not one to be feared by either the U.S. or S. Korea. Yes, their will be casualties, but we shall prevail.

      In the event they do something stupid then it’s time for Kim, his General staff and army to be ‘euthanized’.

      The Chinese, S. Korea and Japan can look foward to a regime change in N. Korea since it has a very large labor market to be utilized not only improving their lot, but so too lowering production costs of many products that are made in those regions for worldwide export.

      I’m hoping the end is near for Kim and his entourage of military thugs.

      Carl Nemo **==

      • Jon

        April 1, 2013 at 3:33 am

        Hi Mr. Nemo,

        I give you this:

        “Kim and his Generals along with high level government apparatchiks have been living large while their people are on the edge of starvation.
        International sanctions against the nation are beginning to extract a heavy toll on their ‘party hearty’ lifestyle. The pain has been creeping upward.”

        And this:

        “A Texas prosecutor and his wife were found killed in their house two months after one of his assistants was gunned down near their office, authorities said.”

        Even in the USA, the pain of the ordinary people is creeping upward.

        J.

      • Jon

        April 1, 2013 at 3:39 am

        Incidentally, is there anything herein that we disagree upon? I pointed out all US military strategic bomber aircraft are nuclear capable, and you concurred.

        I also pointed out that for their few hours of a flying mission, the bombers would be grounded for repairs for more than one hundred times as long as the bombing mission took, and so the DPRK had little to fear.

        I didn’t see you even addressing that point. Which empire do you think will fall first?

        J.

        J.

        • Carl Nemo **==

          April 1, 2013 at 5:57 am

          Hi Jon,

          I always enjoy your posts which seemingly comes from a superior intellect along with thoughtful analysis. : )

          In many cases I write to augment commentary rather than to dispute such.

          The nominal age of world empires is about 250 years. Here’s a link to an article discussing Sir John Glubb’s book on the subject which can be downloaded in .pdf format.

          http://alfin2100.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-life-span-of-empires-250-years.html

          North Korea does not fall in the empire classifcation whereas the U.S. post WWII surely does and seemingly agewise our nation is ripe for collapse first financially, then through balkanization of the U.S. into areas with similar interests; e.g. certain factions in Texas wanting to secede from the Union. This is not necessarily bad since all of creation as well as the evolution of societies are in a constant state of flux.

          Thanks for your reply to my post.

          Carl Nemo **==

  3. Bill Cravener

    March 29, 2013 at 4:44 am

    “Saber-rattling” or “My gun is bigger then your gun” bravado. If we’re not making North Korea nervous we certainly must be making China so.

  4. larry

    March 29, 2013 at 2:38 pm

    Saber rattling – nay i say. This is human comendy at it’s finest.