Thinking Small For Freedom

As adults, we have all experienced that feeling of being overwhelmed by events. Successful people have long known that this can best be overcome by making lists. How?

Well, when looking at an overfull agenda of things that must be done, it is easy to experience a kind of attention deficit disorder. We keep getting pulled off each task by other tasks that need to be done until the net result at the end of the day is zero real progress. If we can break that overwhelming agenda down into small component parts, and make ourselves accomplish only one small thing at a time, we can whittle away the nightmare until it becomes manageable – and then completely handled – in reasonably short order.

The struggle for freedom is surprisingly similar. We are faced by a loss of our civil liberties, a selection process for political candidates that leaves us with a choice between bad and worse, endless wars abroad that we didn’t want and a looming New World Order that will end freedom forever. Every morning, the march of headlines makes us ill as we drink our morning coffee. We know we have to make a living to make any difference at all, yet we also want to march for this or that, write articles, network with other freedom lovers, investigate this or that corruption, and very soon it becomes obvious that we haven’t enough hours in the day.

Our oppressors count on this, actually. Our paralysis is essential to the success of their plans.

The key to survival is thinking small. I don’t mean that our overall goals should go by the wayside, far from it! I do mean that we have to accept that no single person can fix everything wrong in this world of ours. Yes, that stinks, but it’s reality. The first step is to accept that fact and make peace with it. The second step is to figure out what you actually can do – what niche you were born to occupy – and homestead the hell out of it.

If you are like me, you feel a considerable amount of rage toward those who have lied and trapped us into the situation where we now find ourselves. Just remember that your best revenge is to live well. What does that mean in this case? It means to live a personally free life. Do not allow fear to change your plans in even the smallest way. Do whatever it is you would have done if you were still free as a bird. Yes, this can lead to bad things happening to you, but you can’t change that. If millions of Americans are doing the same, it will take the powers that be quite awhile to get around to you, so you have a chance to live out a good portion of your life – and perhaps your whole natural life if you are very lucky – in happiness and personal freedom. Lead by example, and your friends and neighbors will follow.

This leads me to another question I have been asked by my friends. How do you deal with the cold sweats in the middle of the night, when you just know they have to be coming for you soon? Well, I’ve experienced those cold sweats more than once in my life (although I was wrong every single time), and I’ve only found one thing that actually works for me. Folks who’ve read my novel, Flight From Eden, will recognize what I am about to say, because my heroine faced such a crisis in my fictional story and I applied my own experience to her solution.

First, you must figure out what it is that you fear, and you must make peace with the fact that feeling fear is not cowardice. Cowardice lies only in allowing our fears to control us. Fear is a natural and healthy emotion. It sharpens the senses and speeds the reactions – and it can keep you alive in very interesting places and circumstances. Unfortunately, our bodies are not perfect, and sometimes the imagination short circuits this process by keeping us afraid even when we are not immediately threatened, an exhausting process that ultimately destroys the effectiveness of our fear when we do really need it.

The chances are that your greatest fear is not death at all. We do fear the process of dying, but death itself is not actually so horrifying. Most of us believe in a higher power and an afterlife of some kind. Death is to be avoided, because it appears so final as far as this life is concerned, and that is a very healthy thing. When it cannot be avoided, death becomes the greatest of adventures, and perhaps a doorway into something even more wonderful. More importantly, death is inescapable for every single one of us. Nobody gets out of this life alive, so you are no different from anyone else in that regard. Acceptance of this can be very difficult, but don’t shy away from the issue. It needs to be explored in the privacy of your own heart.

The chances are that you fear being “disappeared” far more than you actually fear death. I know I do, and you would have to be an idiot not to fear the isolation, and even the possible torture, that will follow. However – and this is why you must face death first – there is an inevitable end to any such situation. Sooner or later, it will come to put a very welcome end to your personal misery.

I have found that I am afraid of fear most of all. I was a skydiver for many years, so I would describe it as those last few seconds, falling, out of control, knowing you are about to die. There is only one big problem with that scenario – it is solely a product of my own imagination, and it is utter and absolute nonsense. I have actually been in really serious trouble in the air, and I recall feeling no fear whatsoever at the time. When adrenaline is that high, you get very cold and methodical about saving your own life. You don’t feel a thing until it is all over, one way or another. In my case, it ended happily, but I doubt I would have felt fear even if it had not. I was far too busy and too focused at the time.

So why be afraid of fear you probably will not even feel? It doesn’t make one single bit of sense, does it? When I get to this point in my cold sweat reverie, I generally fall asleep – and sleep like a baby.

Once you are free personally, and at peace with your fears, you can focus effectively on whittling away at that to-do list. Take a step back from yourself, and figure out what it is that you do best, where your individual talent really lies. Apply logic to determine how this can best serve the cause of freedom, and the chances are it will make you a living as well. Make a list of reasonable tasks that you can personally accomplish and accomplish well in the time allotted for your lifetime.

Then focus your energies on those tasks and perform them – one small thing at a time.