Another Obama sweep; McCain wins VA, MD, DC

Barack Obama ran his winning streak to 8 for 8 Tuesday night, sweeping the Virginia, Maryland and District of Columbia primaries, following up on strong wins in five other primaries and caucuses over the past week.

Obama finishes the sweep as the undisputed front runner for the Democratic Presidential nomination and the final delegate count is expected to wipe out Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presumptive lead among so called “super delegates.”

On the GOP side, John McCain continued his inevitable march to the Republican nomination with close wins in Virginia and DC and a convincing win in Maryland.

Clinton, shaking up her campaign staff by sacking her manager and deputy manager, appears to be conceding February to Obama, deciding instead to concentrate on delegate-laden states like Texas, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

But observers say her strategy may be too little to late to stop the surging Obama. Like Rudy Giuliani, who skipped earlier contests to concentrate on Florida, she may not be able to stop Obama’s momentum.

Reports The Associated Press:

Barack Obama, already claiming a “new American majority,” is focusing more and more on the likely Republican candidate in the November presidential election as he continues to rack up big victories over Hillary Rodham Clinton in their race for the Democratic nomination.

Obama surged to the fore in the delegate race for the party prize with resounding primary victories Tuesday in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. On the GOP side, John McCain took another step in shoring up his credentials as the runaway Republican front-runner despite lukewarm support from the party’s conservative base.

Clinton, considered the overwhelming Democratic favorite just a few weeks, was left to turn her attention to Texas and Ohio in an attempt to pump new life into her suddenly stumbling campaign.

“There’s a great saying in Texas, all hat and no cattle,” she told a boisterous crowd of about 12,000 at a college basketball arena in El Paso Tuesday evening as the shape of the latest Obama ballot victories were unfolding. “Well, after seven years of George Bush, we need a lot less hat and lot more cattle.”

Before flying into Texas, she told a Cincinnati television station that “Ohio is really going to count in determining who our Democratic nominee is going to be.” She also declared herself the “underdog candidate” in the Wisconsin primary next Tuesday, the same day Obama’s birthplace Hawaii holds its primary.

In was at the University of Wisconsin where Obama characterized his surging campaign to a crowd of 17,000. “This is what change looks like when it happens from the bottom up,” he said. “This is the new American majority.”

Looking ahead to November, he said that although he honors McCain’s experience as a war hero, he is linked to failed policies put in place by President Bush.

“George Bush won’t be on the ballot this November, but the Bush-Cheney war and the Bush-Cheney tax cuts for the wealthy will be on the ballot,” he said.

McCain told supporters in Virginia it is clear where either Obama or Clinton would take the country “and we dare not let them. They will paint a picture of the world in which America’s mistakes are a greater threat to our security than the malevolent intentions of an enemy that despises us and our ideals.”

The Associated Press count of delegates showed Obama with 1,223. Clinton had 1,198, falling behind for the first time since the campaign began. Neither was close to the 2,025 needed to win the nomination.

His victories Tuesday were by overwhelming margins — 75 percent of the vote in the nation’s capital , nearly two-thirds in Virginia and approximately 60 percent in Maryland.

Obama moved past Clinton in the delegate chase on the basis of the Tuesday’s primaries and newly released results from last Saturday’s Washington caucuses. Additional delegates still to be allocated from his new victories were certain to add to his lead.

McCain’s victory in Virginia was a relatively close one, the result of an outpouring of religious conservatives who backed Mike Huckabee.

The AP count showed McCain with 821 delegates. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who dropped out of the race last week, had 288. Huckabee had 241 and Texas Rep. Ron Paul had 14.


  1. Sandra Price

    SEAL…Your wisdom is endless. I’m often found wandering around International sites, and their opinions of America are not flattering, but often true. Our obsession with God, our desire to reprogram our citizens to follow laws of the churches are leaving us weak in the minds of others.

    America was formed around freedoms, not select religions. Bush 43 is considered a two-faced joke. His foreign policies come from a deranged plan to destroy Islam and any other religion that is other than Christian.

    It seems as if Obama has a better set of morals, manners and a sense of right vs wrong. His color is an advantage at this time when America is sick of racism and homophobia. He leans into more goverment programs but if he can instill academics into the schools it is possible that some of those programs can be reduced.

  2. AustinRanter

    Seal, I agree with you about Obama…he’s a smart young guy. He knows what he knows and has the snap to bring in those to help him with what he doesn’t know.

    Experience that Hillary has…well, let’s see…one more term in the Senate…and being the wife of a president who had a pretty gregarous two terms associated with mucho fun and games…

    I don’t want to discount or rudely minimize Hillary’s overall life experiences, but I’m just not moved by them.

  3. bryan mcclellan

    Hey ,welcome back gaslaugh,missed your pointed and informed emissions.Har Har…I thought that was you tother day by your stylio.

  4. gaslaugh

    Dam (Seal) above, excellent points as in I totally agree.
    Each day (these days) contains more drama than a life time would have a few decades back. Maybe just maybe (Obama) can do miracles. Nothing wrong with hoping he can.

    This nation has strayed so far from the original outline, ie. (the constitution).

    My greatest concern/doubt is that the previous (two or three) generations of Americans have trouble understanding right from wrong and instead believe their are many legitimate gray areas.

  5. SEAL

    There are other things to consider in choosing the president at this particular time. One that Obama could never publically voice is the advantage he would automatically have when dealing with the leaders in the Middle East and African continent – he is a black male.

    Considering the amount of diplomacy that is necessary with the muslim nations to repair the damage and their attitude towards women, which candidate do you think would be better suited for dealing with them?

    We have the opportunity to send a message to the world next November. We will choose either A female or a black male as our leader. That says we have grown up and rejected the attitudes and policies of the past. But choosing the Black male would be a far stronger signal in this case because the world already knows all about the Clintons. The European countries would not be thrilled with another dose of Clinton.

    Choosing Barak Obama as our next leader would be the smart thing to do. He is new and fresh and a hundred eighty degrees from GWB. He would automatically be received with an open mind by Middle Easterners.

  6. gaslaugh

    Pills? (LFTL) hmmm….shall I tell the truth. I still believe that God made ativan before he created the universe. I’ve been missed?….(sure).. and my head didn’t stink after I extracted it.

    Well let me verbalize something about the current political dram unfolding (so as to be politically correct) concerning the (owner) of this blog.

    Whoever is elected (president/God) of this nation, (he, she or it) better be able to perform/work miracles and I mean “BIG DAM MIRACLES” because that and only that will save the “American Dream”.

  7. mary cali

    Sandra, I don’t know what in my post would lead you to believe that I “could be taken in by the GOP”. I have been railing against them for over 25 years.
    I have already stated that I would not vote for McCain. In no way would I vote for a Republican, particularly a neocon. I am merely pointing out that I am not happy with my choices. I don’t believe in Messiah presidents who will unite us all and lead us out of the wilderness, as the followers of Obama seem to think. I go back to JFK, who did not have a long resume either. One of the first things he screwed up was the Bay of Pigs. The world is in a very pecarious place. I prefer a president with foreign policy and military experience, but not one of McCain’s political persuasion.

  8. LurkingFromTheLeft


    …how many glasses and/or pills have you had today?

    …welcome back – you’ve been missed –

    …or at least that’s what they’ve said!


  9. gaslaugh

    Lurkingfromtheleft (LFTL)…laughing…..still laughing…wait a minute….ok, thats better. Don’t remember me huh? Hell I have trouble remembering me but what can I say.

    Its Gene….oh God!!!…LFTL….stop that dam crying. So are you crying because I’m back or because you missed me. If your crying because I’m back, LIE TO ME.

    If you want to know where I have been (probably not) I’ve been looking for my head. Finally found it the other day, it was up my….choke, cough, belch……ASS. God did I ever get constipated. Anyway, good to see your still commenting. Take care and if its OK with the (dark leaders of the underworld) I’ll shall return with and occasional enlighting comment.

    NOW YOUR laughing!!!!………..(gene)