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Remembering September 11, 2001

By DOUG THOMPSON
September 11, 2011

 

The morning of September 11, 2001, dawned clear and crisp. A bright, blue sky overhead as I drove into Washington, DC, headed for the State Department for a routine assignment shooting a ceremonial function: a quiet routine day.

Or so I thought.

Shortly after 9:30 a.m., the Blackberry on my belt, vibrated, signalling the arrival of a new email. The short message read: “Explosion. Pentagon.”

I loaded my gear back into my Jeep Wrangler and headed for the 14th Street Bridge, only to find it closed, so I turned towards Southeast DC. knowing I would have to cross over the Potomac near the Navy Yard and take an alternate route,

I arrived at the Pentagon to fine a gaping hole in the side of the massive building facing Columbia Pike. I also recognized two things that I hoped I would never experience again: the smell of aviation fuel and burning flesh.

I would spend more than 36 hours straight shooting images from that terrible day and the ones that followed.

The video below is a collection of photos from that terrible day and its aftermath. The video above is from a project recognizing the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, put together from the many sources of news and individual video footage from that day in New York. Both projects would not have been possible without the efforts of many creative people from the chosen profession that I love.

As difficult as it is, today is a time to revisit both. and to remember those who lost their lives in those tragic events.

5 Responses to Remembering September 11, 2001

  1. Sandune

    September 11, 2011 at 8:26 am

    Thank you Chief, you captured the horrfying beauty that will stay in our memories forever. Your footage is incredible.

  2. griff

    September 11, 2011 at 6:17 pm

    I was in our office parking lot in Glens Falls, Ny loading our van for the day’s work ahead. A very large plane flew way too low overhead, making a banking left turn. My co-worker observed that it was too large a plane to be landing at the local county airfield.

    About thirty minutes later cell phones began ringing and televisions flickered to life. The plane that banked over our parking lot turned out to be Flight 11. We didn’t get much work done that day, but the beer was flowing freely at the hotel that evening.

  3. b mcclellan

    September 11, 2011 at 6:49 pm

    While the guts continually are ripped from this most recent generation of cannon fodder, focus is placed on yesterdays life, living over ere and again a bloody nose our foreign policies have wrought.

    Enlightenment to our core problems are well hidden though documented in a black maelstrom of concealment and endless highways of regret,
    sans action to correct, perpetuates needless hapless reaction and political fog.

    Stand up America, demand an accounting of the destruction not only on your shores, but of the power displayed by the shadowy pernicious tentacles enveloping our tiny blue orb.

    Cast off with solutions America, or please go down for the third time so that true mariners can right this ship without violence. Hack..

  4. woody188

    September 11, 2011 at 11:25 pm

    Isn’t it funny how when we remember 9/11, no one remembers Building 7. Most Americans don’t even know more than two buildings collapsed in New York, and one (Building 7 also called the Soloman Brothers building) was announced to have collapsed before it actually did. I’m sure there is some math wizard that can tell you the odds of this occurring are slim to none. Isn’t that why it’s conveniently forgotten in the media driven memorials we are subjected to each anniversary?

    Are you ready for the red pill yet Neo?
    Or will you again take the blue pill and go back to your beer and football?

  5. woody188

    September 12, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    Why can we remember the Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and Flight 93, but we can’t remember Building 7?

    That would be like honoring the USS Arizona but forgetting the USS West Virginia commemorating December 7th, 1941. Yet every year no media or government events like to mention Building 7 or what occurred there. Even posts to this site are removed if they mention Building 7.

    WHY?