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Boehner: GOP will do debt deal without Democrats if necessary

By Doug Thompson
July 25, 2011

With bipartisan debt-limit talks deadlocked, House Republicans and Senate Democrats readied rival emergency fallback plans Sunday in hopes of reassuring world financial markets the U.S. government will avoid an unprecedented default.

In a conference call, Speaker John Boehner summoned his conservative rank and file to swing behind a “new measure” that could clear both houses of Congress.

“It won’t be ‘Cut, Cap and Balance’ as we passed it,” he said, referring to a measure — killed in the Senate on Friday — that would have required spending cuts of an estimated $6 trillion as well as congressional approval of a constitutional balanced budget amendment for ratification by the states.

The new approach is “going to require some of you to make some sacrifices,” he added, according to a person familiar with his remarks.

Separately, President Barack Obama invited the two top congressional Democrats to a highly unusual White House meeting Sunday evening.

One of them, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, was at work on a Democratic fallback measure, too.

Without congressional action by Aug. 2, the Treasury will be unable to pay all its bills, risking a default that could have severe consequences for the U.S. economy and the world’s, too.

Details of the rival plans were sketchy.

Republican officials said Boehner envisioned an increase in the nation’s debt limit by $1 trillion and slightly more than that in federal spending cuts, with the promise of additional progress on both sides of the ledger if Congress could agree.

Democratic officials said Reid was at work on legislation to raise the government’s debt limit by $2.4 trillion — enough to assure no recurrence of the current crisis until 2013 — and reduce spending by slightly more.

They said that plan envisioned no higher taxes.

Administration officials have stopped just short of promising to veto the approach Boehner outlined. Obama has also said for months any bill must include higher revenue.

The White House was largely consigned to a spectator’s role on a weekend that began with Boehner’s decision to call off talks with Obama.

But the president arranged an early evening meeting with Reid and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi.

Asked earlier what the administration’s plan was to avoid default, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said, “Our plan is to get Congress to raise the debt ceiling on time.”

The state of play veered between bipartisanship and brinkmanship on an issue of immense economic consequences.

Despite hours of compromise talks in the Capitol, lawmakers’ aides had so far been unable to agree on a two-step plan that would satisfy Obama’s demand for a large enough increase in the debt limit to tide the Treasury over until after the 2012 elections.

Interviewed on Fox, Boehner said, “I would prefer to have a bipartisan approach to solve this problem. If that is not possible, I and my Republican colleagues in the House are prepared to move on our own.”

He arranged to brief the Republican rank and file on a conference call late in the day.

It was unclear when Reid would disclose details of his own plan.

The officials who described the rival fallback plans spoke on condition of anonymity, citing the sensitivity of the issue.

Boehner’s plan, still under negotiation on Capitol Hill, is intended to get the nation beyond this crisis and snag enough votes from House Republicans who won’t raise the debt limit without spending cuts, too.

Deeper and more complex reductions in the nation’s deficits would be part of the deal, but under later timelines.

White House chief of staff William Daley said Obama was insisting that any package must expand the debt ceiling beyond the next presidential and congressional elections and into 2013 to provide economic certainty. Daley said anything short of that would be a gimmick and prompt the world to say: “These people just can’t get their act together.”

White House and congressional leaders talked past each other on the Sunday TV shows as negotiations unfolded in secrecy.

“There will be a two-stage process. It’s just not physically possible to do all of this in one step,” Boehner said. “I know the president is worried about his next election. But, my God, shouldn’t he be worried about the country?”

Republican leaders called their rank and file back to Washington earlier than expected for the new work week and set a mid-afternoon Monday meeting to go over the debt-limit legislation.

With an eye on the financial markets, Geithner insisted anew the United States would not default.

“It’s just unthinkable,” Geithner said. “We never do that. It’s not going to happen.”

The debt deal-making has consumed Washington for weeks and has put on display a government that at times risks utter dysfunction.

Even after talks about between Obama and Boehner broke down in spectacular fashion Friday, Geithner said the two men were still negotiating.

He also suggested the ambitious framework the two leaders had discussed, targeting a deficit reduction of $4 trillion, remained under consideration.

“I don’t know. It may be pretty hard to put Humpty Dumpty back together again,” Boehner said of that grand plan. “But my last offer is still out there. I have never taken my last offer off of the table and they never agreed to my last offer.”

That last offer included $800 billion in new tax revenues as part of a broad overhaul that would lower tax rates. Obama wanted $400 billion more in tax revenue for deficit reduction to help balance out the spending cuts. Or, if not that, a reduction in some of the proposed cuts being discussed to entitlement programs such as Medicare.

The talks halted primarily over that issue and over how to ensure that both parties kept their reform promises in the months ahead.

Any plan must get through the Democratic-run Senate, where Majority Leader Reid has called a short-term debt limit expansion unacceptable.

Obama’s role looms, too.

Asked if Obama would veto a plan that did not extend the government’s borrowing authority into 2013, Daley said, “Yes.”

One key Republican lawmaker scoffed.

“I think that’s a ridiculous position because that’s what he’s going to get presented with,” said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla.

Under any scenario, Washington’s leaders have run themselves almost out of time.

It will take days to move legislation through Congress. A default could cause catastrophic damage to the standing and the economy of the United States.

Daley said, in fact, the consequences are already taking hold.

“I don’t think there’s any question there’s been enormous damage done to our creditworthiness around the world,” Daley said.

Boehner appeared on “Fox News Sunday.” Geithner was on Fox, ABC’s “This Week” and CNN’s “State of the Union.” Daley and Coburn spoke on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” and Daley also appeared on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

___

Associated Press writers David Espo, Alan Fram and Nedra Pickler contributed to this report.

14 Responses to Boehner: GOP will do debt deal without Democrats if necessary

  1. woody188

    July 25, 2011 at 8:20 pm

    BREAKING: President Obama Addresses the Nation Tonight at 9

    Tonight at 9 p.m. EDT President Obama will address the nation on the stalemate in Washington over avoiding default and the best approach to cutting deficits.

    You can watch the speech live at WhiteHouse.gov/live starting at 9 p.m. EDT tonight.

    • griff

      July 25, 2011 at 8:42 pm

      No thanks.

      • woody188

        July 25, 2011 at 8:47 pm

        I always watch to see what people are being told to believe.

  2. griff

    July 25, 2011 at 9:14 pm

    I find it amusing that the politicians and their media mouthpieces continue to call this a debt crisis and the only solution is to increase our debt.

    Hello!? Is there any body out there?

    You would think that the problem of having too much debt would best be solved by decreasing the debt, not increasing it.

    But of course, this is America, circa 2011.

    Bring home the troops. From Germany (methinks Hitler might be dead now), Japan (ditto Hirohito), Korea (the US presence is actually a hindrance to Korean unification and diplomatic efforts) and the other 130 or so countries that “require” our divine presence.

    Oops, did I forget the Middle East? Yeah, from there too.

    End all foreign aid.

    For starters…

    • Carl Nemo

      July 25, 2011 at 9:27 pm

      Hear hear on your summary recommendations my friend in thought…!

      “Griff for President”… : |

      Carl Nemo **==

      • griff

        July 25, 2011 at 10:10 pm

        H. I’m allergic to bullets in my brain.

        • Carl Nemo

          July 25, 2011 at 10:22 pm

          Just the same we’ll suit you up in battle rifle proof kevlar based jump suit and helmet with a bullet proof lexan viewing port for the duration. You’ll kinda look like “Gort” the robot that accompanied Klatu on his mission to “save the earth” in the movie “The Day the Earth Stood Still” … : ))

          Your summary ideas for remediation fo the Republic warrants your election and protection. : D

          Carl Nemo **==

          • griff

            July 26, 2011 at 6:41 am

            My exploratory committee has come back with an emphatic NO!

  3. Carl Nemo

    July 25, 2011 at 9:24 pm

    Did Obama think about our ‘debt’ problems when he pitched out a billion dollars to Egypt to help with their unemployment problem post Mubarak’s fall from power or the money he pitched out to South American strongmen as he galavanted around South America a few months back or the 2.5 billion ‘military aid’ money promised Pakistan via SOS Clinton. He and his coterie of free-spending ‘advisers’ and cabinet secretaries have had a 2.5 year spending spree with nothing to show American tax debtors who are now saddled with this astronomical, mind-numbing, nation-destroying debt.

    This guy is an incredibly gifted speaker, but an empty suit to boot. What a dangerous dichotomy for a nation that’s now being tested relative to its financial longevity among nations. His actions to date indicates to me he hates America. Everything he’s been involved or conveniently not involved with has diminished this nation.

    I cannot bear to hear this man speak after the realization sunk into my consciousness even prior to his inauguration that we were snookered by a ‘slick-talking’ scamster and the shadowy puppeteers that present and control these types of candidates.

    I’ll supply a link to my “Rain on the Parade” blogpost to CHB on January 20, 2009. The important “Red Ice Creations” link can be copied and fetched. The material is still available for viewing and has surely come true relative to the vermin this president has surrounded himself as advisers, czars or whatever other ‘groovy’ tag that might be given to them, “leftists all”…! : |

    http://www.capitolhillblue.com/node/13830

    Carl Nemo **==

  4. woody188

    July 25, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    I don’t hear anyone talking about the plan to force the Fed to destroy it’s $1.6 trillion in Treasury bonds. Why is it we all have to sacrifice to save the banks but the banks won’t sacrifice to save us?

    If the Fed won’t work to stabilize the situation, then their charter should be revoked as that is a supposedly a primary function of their whole existence. Of course they are one of the reasons we are in this mess in the first place. Go figure.

    Obama’s speech wasn’t too terrible, but it did seem to me more of a “it’s not my fault” type of speech. He clearly laid blame for the lack of progress on the issue on the House Republicans while deflecting his own unwillingness to compromise.

    • Carl Nemo

      July 25, 2011 at 9:38 pm

      I noticed the lead line concerning his televised ‘sermon’ from a Yahoo in the News article: I quote “The crisis could damage the economy”. One thing for sure; his presence in the White House for the past 2.5 years along with his coterie of lame cabinet secretaries, czars and other hangers on from prevous administrations have surely damaged the economy.

      It’s tragic that we have to put up with these Presidential failures for a minimum of four years at a pop with no chance of dumping them shy of impeachment. Too bad there’s not a vote of confidence tasked to the public at the two year mark and if the ‘elected ones’ can’t make the cut, then it’s time to have another election and replace them. They also can’t run for reelection if they lose the vote of confidence. Why any of them get reelected to serve eight years is beyond my comprehension. None of them from Congressional District Rep, U.S. Senators to the Presidency should serve more than two years…period! : |

      Carl Nemo **==

      • woody188

        July 25, 2011 at 10:02 pm

        They get re-elected because the game is fixed. And I’m not even talking about electronic voting “irregularities.” They gerrymander the districts and make it near impossible to remove incumbents.

  5. b mcclellan

    July 25, 2011 at 11:15 pm

    Looks to me like it’s left up to who thinks they’re bullet proof before any answer forthcoming emits enough intentional class to jeopardize standardized static cling.

    Where are those confounded dryer sheets ?

    Can we tumble dry truth or shall the lines of wash never end ?

    • b mcclellan

      July 25, 2011 at 11:26 pm

      Addendum, please.
      For our Women and Men in armed service of my / our raspberry patch, we are a grateful nation. Yrrebeulb.