Ron Paul’s racism emerges once again

Ron Paul (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Twice-failed Presidential wannabe Ron Paul’s racism is never far from the surface and reappeared Friday when he admitted to MSNBC’s Chris Matthews that he would not have voted for the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 if he had been in Congress at the time.

But Paul has a long and sordid history of hatred towards African-Americans — from his racist rants in his newsletters to his comments that clearly suggest a white supremacist attitude.

On June 4, 2004, while other members of Congress honored the 40th anniversary of the historic act, Paul stood on the floor of the House of Representatives and delivered a diatribe against integration, claiming it violated the Constitution “while diminishing individual freedoms.”

“The Civil Rights Act of 1964 not only violated the Constitution and reduced individual liberty; it also failed to achieve its stated goals of promoting racial harmony and a color-blind society,” Paul declared.

Not a surprising statement from a man who is touted on white supremacist web sites as their candidate for President.

On his “Hardball” show Friday, Matthews responded to Paul when he said he wouldn’t have voted for the Civil Rights act:

I once knew a laundromat when I was in the Peace Corps training in Louisiana, in Baker, Louisiana. A laundromat had this sign on it in glaze, ‘whites only on the laundromat, just to use the laundromat machines. This was a local shop saying ‘no blacks allowed.’ You say that should be legal.

“That’s ancient history,” Paul said. “That’s over and done with.”

Sadly, it’s not ancient history as long as racists like Ron Paul continue to appear on the political scene. On the bright side, his racism is just one more reason why Ron Paul will never be President of the United States.

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23 Responses to "Ron Paul’s racism emerges once again"

  1. jim0001  May 15, 2011 at 9:05 am

    First and foremost, Discrimination is wrong in any form!
    Title II of the Civil Rights Act 1964 is unconstitutional. So is the hate crimes act. So are no smoking bans in resturants. ad infinitum…..
    Actually, many Democrats voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964. That is not referenced in this article because adherence to the Constitution is abhorrent to Democrats and liberals.
    Anytime one segment of our society is given preferential treatment over another segments of society, it IS discrimination and IS unconstitutional.
    We tolerate many things that are racist in our society such as the Miss Black America, The Black Caucus in Congress, the Black police officers organizations, United Negro College fund, etc.
    It is deemed acceptable for an elected official to accept an award from the NAACP but not the KKK. Regardless of their modus operandi; the fact remains, Both are racially motivated organizations that discriminate because they promote one race over another.
    One is called racist if they criticize BHO for his policies. This too is discrimination.
    Now we are painting anyone as racist who disagrees not with discrimination but with the CRA 1964?
    I disagree with Ron Paul on some issues but, I do not consider Ron Paul’s comments on this issue to be racist. I do hear him quoting the Constitution. In fact he is probably the only candidate / politician that understands and does quote it. I think of the “A men are created equal” that Jefferson wrote in the Declaration of Independence as a standard for our Country. The 13th, 14th, 15th ammendments cover rights. There was no need for the CRA 1964.
    Lastly, discrimination is wrong in any form!

  2. Eric  May 15, 2011 at 10:14 am

    This article is disgusting.

    (1) The Civlil RIghts Act was passed with the intention of combating racism.
    (2) Ron Paul opposes parts of the Civil Rights Act.
    (3) Therefore Ron Paul is racist.

    This is your argument, and the holes in this logic should be readily apparent. You suppose that there can be absolutely no other reason to oppose the Civil Rights Act than racism. A respect for individual choices and freedom of association are just a ruse for deep-seated racism.

    I think you should be ashamed of yourself for writing this.

  3. J. Cole  May 15, 2011 at 10:46 am

    @Eric,
    if you can’t read the plain words of the man saying that the CRA would be “diminishing individual freedoms” (clearly in context meaning the freedom to discriminate), then you may want to revisit you own logic training. “A respect for individual choices and freedom” are not racism necessarily, but when you tie it so overtly and specifically to the CRA as crazy Uncle Ron does, then it’s very clear that here it is, in fact, evidence of racism.

  4. Sandune  May 15, 2011 at 10:49 am

    Good reply Jim. I agree that discrimination in any form is wrong, immoral and sadly is still active in America. Americans continue to insist on groups who demand labels based on anything different from the “norm.” The way many minorities are labeled and treated shows many that we are unstable when it comes to recognizing who and what we are.

    Bigotry weakens America and it is sad that so many use it to strengthen American values. I was confused with the CRA and chose to counter my own family when I worked for it. I wonder how it would have worked out had there been no Civil Rights Act…….Could we have gotten over our discrimination without the government? That is the question I cannot answer.

    In America we look to the government to confirm our own opinions about others. I learned years ago not to ask anything like this in the government in America. I see nothing of value in classifying others as Christians especially when it comes to our elections.

    I went through the 2008 election, voting again for Ron Paul because neither party showed me a viable candidate but the reaction from the Republican voters shocked me to such a degree that I felt that I no longer can be an American.

    The problem with Dr. Paul is that he assumes his voter base is not racist and he needs to cover these issues with this base. Yes, they are deeply seated white Christian bigots as bad as can be found in America. I was a registered Libertarian for years and found the party was limited in the kind freedoms they ran on.

    The LP representing Individual rights is not much more than a slogan and there is little action planned to free everyone from the growing government social laws. It’s like being a little bit pregnant.

    It could be that our human species cannot tolerate equality in any form. The moment our tribes invented Gods it brought on wars. Skin color became the American war. It is not going to end in our lifetime. America is at war with itself and our evolution is in jeopardy. You see I do not believe that anything or anyone has planned our lives in any way. We, as individual should be designing our own futures but we are too insecure and ill-prepared to stand up and do it. We like the visions of masses of people in sexual frenzies just waiting for God to step in.

    Nice reply

  5. Walt Reuther  May 15, 2011 at 10:52 am

    Ron Paul is a racist. He will never be president due, in part, to this very fact. White men in this country are running scared because they are outnumbered and they fear that the continued awakening of the masses threatens their power structure. It does. They are stunned that a Black man is Commander in chief and they are stirring their pot of zealots in order to try to win next time.
    What they failed to realize is that the likes of the Koch brothers and corporate greed (and the absurdity of the supreme court decision that gives the right of free speech…read: the purchase of elections and politicians…to corporations) has dealt their movement a great blow because it woke the sleeping giant and the giant’s eyes are wide open. WE are the PEOPLE and when you strike us, we multiply!

    • Sandune  May 15, 2011 at 2:17 pm

      Walter, White men and women are scared because even as a team, we are out voted. I have never asked the government to give me special laws but at this time we are exploding as leaders in our Universities, our corporations and on Wall Street. When we reach the majority, we may multiply too!

      I realize women are better off than those poor souls living is muslim nations. But I can also associate the feelings of being an unworthy minority. It hit me when I had two daughters instead of adding more sons to the Price family. He brought a son into the fold so I was eased up from having to produce one. I was told that the girls would never be allowed private school and he would never pay tuition in any college. He didn’t have to. I did it! The damn fool got his secretary pregnant and I threw him out. She presented him with another girl. Oy!

      I have met Congressman Paul on many occasions and he has slipped into a very close case for racist comments. The GOP has no acceptable agenda and not even Dr. Paul can find one. His ideas come from working from the outside into the center of our government and this will never sell. Until some leader stands fully erect stating absolute equality for every American, I will have to write in P.J. O’Roark again and again.

      Walter you have some points are you writing opinions anywhere?,

  6. Abel Magwitch  May 15, 2011 at 11:58 am

    How would I get through life if I did not have self-appointed, elitist mugwumps on MSNBC telling me how to think and vote?

    • ray  May 19, 2011 at 9:29 am

      by having the “self-appointed, elitist mugwumps on” fox news “telling [you] how to think and vote?”

  7. bill gillingham  May 15, 2011 at 12:05 pm

    How can the tagline of your site be:

    “Because nobody’s Life, Liberty or Property is safe while congress is in session or the white house is occupied”

    … and you don’t get that Paul’s complaint is about one section of the Act that infringes upon property rights?

    If Paul is such a racist, why does he want drugs decriminalized at the federal level? Doesn’t the drug war hit minorities the hardest?

    Get real!

  8. frank verismo  May 15, 2011 at 2:14 pm

    @Sandune
    “I wonder how it would have worked out had there been no Civil Rights Act…….Could we have gotten over our discrimination without the government?”

    Excellent question. Rosa Parks, Stetson Kennedy, MLK and countless other non-government people did all the heavy lifting – so I’d have to say yes.

    Enshrining truths in people’s hearts is always worth infinitely more than doing so on a piece of paper. Plus, you avoid all pork-barrel and compromises mentioned by Bill above.

    I’m enjoying Doug’s flailing assaults on Ron Paul – he certainly wouldn’t go to these lengths if he wasn’t taking him seriously.

  9. Chris Cantwell  May 15, 2011 at 2:21 pm

    Did you put any thought whatsoever into this hit piece? I hope not, because if this is what you come up with when you think, you’re mind is severely lacking.

    I could run around smoking crack with Rachel Maddow for 6 months and do better.

    Ron Paul has never written anything praising white supremacy, others wrote articles hinting at such things in a publication that carried his name, when it was brought to his attention, he stopped it, quickly.

    If Ron Paul is a racist, why does he defend the “Ground Zero Mosque”?
    If Ron Paul is a racist, why does he want us to stop killing brown people overseas?

    Maybe its time for you to start paying attention to what a person says before you call them names.

  10. Sandune  May 15, 2011 at 2:38 pm

    Frank, Doug is the master of bringing all opinions into the members of CHB. He and I have had many fights on just about every subject to do with government. The first thing I do every morning after I check on the earthquakes in California, is to see what the Chief has written since the previous day.

    When we put all the candidates out for inspection, we all realize the weakness of both houses of congress. If we miss something, Doug will remind us…….

    I remember the brutal killings of several young men who were killed for being gay. Even when this was a point of a thread at Reader Rant, very few had any sympathy for the victims. It had been determined that gay men were naturally sex offenders of little boys.

    Today we have a different point of view and Doug did some action to bring this about. My background is in live theater where the gay community makes us great theater.

    In this case of such extreme discrimination, the government had to do something. Hate crimes can be the most brutal as it often comes from within a family. .

  11. frank verismo  May 15, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    “My background is in live theater where the gay community makes us great theater.”

    The entertainment world – and theater in particular – has always been a fantastic magnet – and shelter – for minorities. I sometimes wonder how much the planet might improve if all citizens had to spend a little time in it. The ultimate boot camp for dissolving silly prejudices.

    “In this case of such extreme discrimination, the government had to do something.”

    I think there are two issues here: ignorance – and the crime ignorance gives rise to. ‘Hate crime’ is an attempt to legislate against stupidity. Not to mention being open to abuse by those who get to set the terms. Righteous ridicule and social unacceptability have always been more powerful tools in this battle.

    Now charge me with a ‘hate crime’ for my obvious prejudice against the ignorant!

  12. DannY Adams  May 15, 2011 at 3:55 pm

    >>“That’s ancient history,” Paul said. “That’s over and done with.”<<

    Maybe it's ancient history and over and done with, Mr. Paul, at least in part because of the Civil Rights Act.

  13. bogofree  May 15, 2011 at 4:08 pm

    This is the monthly ” Paul is a racist” article. Really gets tired after a bit since the only evidence is that Paul has a different interpretation of the CRA act and its success than the author.

    Interesting post on theater and Gays. For many years I had a self contained behavior program in the public school system and you can just imagine the stereotypes these kids had. My mothers neighbor was “Arthur” would was a wonder and Gay. I remember bringing Aurthur into class one day with his baritone voice and a build like the defensive tackle he was in college. Arthur was a magical story teller, a creative chef, a mechanic who was clever and inventive and a master of just about anything he attempted. He was entertaining and patient and the imagine of a man’s man to these kids. Many of the kids were Hispanic and he was fluent. At the end of the day they were pleading for a return visit and he said “Would you still want me back if I told you I was Gay?” Stunned silence followed by a million questions. I will always remember these young boys – most in jail now and most in gangs – lining up to shake his hand and give him a hug. He came back and with his partner. These kids may have still kept an external image for their “friends” but I firmly believe the internal one was forever changed.

  14. Sandune  May 15, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Bogo, in the world of theater, it all depends on if a person can act and in the world of profession musicians, can they express themselves in music. I managed a small chamber music group on the Central Coast of California and we had many social drop outs playing the music of Bach with such talent that their nervousness about being “different” was swallowed up by what they did with their string instruments. When the human body is trained to dance, the result can be stunningly beautiful. Many people who prefer expressing themselves with their bodies can erase any nervousness about how they look sexually. This goes for women as well as men.

    Gays are attracted to the beauty of the arts. It cuts through the stereotypes that others put them in and releases their inner beauty. I personally prefer to work for gay actors as their checks never bounce and they generally smell better than their macho actors.

  15. Cilla Mitchell  May 15, 2011 at 10:03 pm

    Ron Paul, much like most of Texas government, puts issues on the back burner, then pushes them off the stove.

    There is no accountability in Texas for the common man anymore. The laws on the books are against Texans.

    Link to video shows how the common man can not get accountability from any agency, including Ron Paul’s office.

    http://www,youtube.com/watch?v=JT7rxa21_Xo,

    Or, just Google Cleveland Mark Mitchell, then click on youtube.

    Thank you.

  16. Tom Metzger  May 16, 2011 at 1:14 pm

    Its to bad the corporate elite would never allow a man who promotes common sense to be president.
    But that’s well and good since the pressure cooker is getting very near exploding.
    And when it does the genie will never go back in the bottle.

  17. woody188  May 16, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    No Shirt, No Shoes, No Service!

    Why, that’s discriminating to the poor!

    Do clothing stores have to carry Hip Hop and Urban Gear?

    Why, that’s discrimination that I can’t buy FUBU at JCPenney!

    Paul was of course referring to the right of the business owner to define their clientele. Right or wrong, it was not the place of Federal government to decide.

  18. George  May 17, 2011 at 12:07 pm

    Not yet clear whether Ron Paul is racist, but his son (and probably his daughter in law) are one. Ron Paul is a libertarian of convenience. He is a libertarian when he sees fit, but is not one when it does not serve his purpose. A shady politician most likely!

  19. D Bonson  May 19, 2011 at 1:48 pm

    Did a corporate entity or major bank buy out CHB?

    • Almandine  May 19, 2011 at 9:03 pm

      Worse.

  20. Salesman  May 19, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    I’ll admit that I think the CRA was necessary at the time. Presently, I find it impossible to even conceive and operate a blatantly racist business in this day and age. Give me $200,000 and I’ll open two resturants side-by-side. One store will be racist and the other open to everyone. Not only do I bet the racist business goes under within a year, but the other business will boom immensely just from peoples’ spite and disgust that anyone would dare open a racist store.

    Perhaps I just came up with an interesting business ploy…

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