Hillary ups the whine factor

Poor Hillary Clinton. She’s says her fellow Democrats are picking on her. She calls it mudslinging but the complaint during Thursday night’s debate in Las Vegas has all the elements of a classic whine: Everyone is being mean to her.

Looks like the lady can dish it out but she can’t take it.

Throughout her political career and her partnership with Bill Clinton, Hillary has been a master of the politics of personal destruction. She and her husband sought to destroy anyone who dared defy them.

Now that she’s getting a little of her own medicine she’s turning all feminine and saying the boys are picking on her simply because she’s a woman.

Nice try Hillary but no cigar…and you recall what your husband used to do with cigars.

Reports The Associated Press:

Under pressure in a feisty debate, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton accused her closest rivals Thursday night of slinging mud “right out of the Republican playbook” and leveled her sharpest criticism of the campaign at their records.

“People are not attacking me because I’m a woman, they’re attacking me because I’m ahead,” Clinton said, striving to protect her standing as front-runner in an increasingly competitive nominating campaign.

“What the American people are looking for right now is straight answers to tough questions, and that is not what we have seen from Senator Clinton on a host of issues,” said Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois in the opening moments of a debate seven weeks before the first contest of the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

“There’s nothing personal about this,” said former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, who joined Obama in bluntly accusing Clinton of forever switching positions on Social Security, driver’s licenses for illegal immigrants and other issues, turning aside the suggestion that she was seeking to hide her positions. Long an advocate of universal health care, she said Obama’s current proposal leaves millions uncovered and that Edwards did not support health care for all when he first ran for president in 2004.

The three-way confrontation at the beginning of a lengthy debate reduced the other Democratic presidential hopefuls on the debate stage to the uncomfortable role of spectator, yet it perfectly captured the race for the party’s nomination. Clinton leads in the nationwide polls, but recent surveys in Iowa show she is in a virtual dead heat with Obama and Edwards.

For Richardson, Sens. Joseph Biden of Delaware and Chris Dodd of Connecticut and Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio, the opening moments were frustrating — and they repeatedly tried to break in.

“Oh, no, don’t make me speak,” Biden said in mock horror when moderator Wolf Blitzer of CNN called on him roughly 15 minutes into the proceedings.

New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who has campaigned in Nevada more than any other presidential hopeful, took verbal shots at Clinton and her two closest pursuers in the polls.

“Let’s stop the mudslinging,” he said.

He said Edwards is engaging in class warfare, Obama was trying to start a generational war and Clinton “with all due respect with her plan on Iraq doesn’t end the war. All I want to do is give peace a chance.”