Dick Wolf, left, executive producer of "Law & Order: Los Angeles," with cast members Skeet Ulrich, center, and Corey Stoll during the NBC Universal Television Critics Association summer press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif. The plot on the Wednesday Dec. 1, 2010 "Law & Order: Los Angeles" includes a philandering golf star and his club-wielding wife. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

Tiger Woods may want to skip this week’s episode of “Law & Order: Los Angeles.”

The plot on Wednesday’s show includes a philandering golf star and his club-wielding wife. When police arrive, the bleeding athlete says his spouse was merely attempting to rescue him — in this case, from their swimming pool rather than a wrecked car.

After Woods’ November 2009 car crash, he acknowledged a string of infidelities and his marriage to Elin Nordegren unraveled. The NBC crime drama goes in a very different direction, with detectives investigating the murder of a female golf pro.

The “Law & Order” franchise is known for its ripped-from-the-headlines approach, but a series spokeswoman called the episode strictly fiction. “Law & Order: Los Angeles,” with Skeet Ulrich, Corey Stoll and Terrence Howard, airs 10 p.m. EST Wednesday on NBC.

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NBC is owned by General Electric Co.

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Online:

http://www.nbc.com/

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Doug Thompson published his first story and photo at age 11 -- a newspaper article about racism and the Klan in Prince Edward County, VA, in 1958. From that point on, he decided to become a newspaperman and did just that -- reporting news and taking photos full-time at his hometown paper, becoming the youngest full-time reporter at The Roanoke Times in Virginia in 1965 and spent most of the past 55+ years covering news around the country and the globe. After a short sabbatical as a political operative in Washington in the 1980s, he returned to the news profession in 1992. Today, he is a contract reporter/photojournalist for BHMedia and owns Capitol Hill Blue and other news websites.