Our nominee for this week’s "through the looking glass" living in fantasy award is Pennsylvania Congressman Curt Weldom who still believes Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.

"I think the jury is still out on WMD," saysWeldon, who is facing a tough challenge from Democrat Jospeh Sestak, former deputy chief of naval operations and first director of Deep Blue, the Navy’s anti-terrorism group.

According to William Bender, wriging to the Delco Times, Weldon also believes Saddam Hussein may have smuggled the weapons to Syria with Russian assistance prior to the March 2003 invasion.

Writes Bender:

"Iraq was not the center of terrorism when we went in," Sestak said at a press conference at Valley Forge National Historic Park. "Osama bin Laden is still missing. I don’t think he’s in Iraq."

Weldon, R-7, of Thornbury, said he supports a milestone-based withdrawal plan instead of a deadline that would "transmit to the enemy our intentions."

"Every military general says the worst thing you can do is put a date certain on when troops should come home," said Weldon, a 10-term incumbent and vice chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.

Under Weldon’s plan, the drawdown of American troops would be based on the ability of Iraqi troops to stand on their own.

Weldon, who voted for the October 2002 resolution authorizing the use of force in Iraq, accused Sestak of politicizing the war and said he should have opposed it when he was in the Navy.

"If you’re being paid as a military leader, you ought to have the backbone to stand up for what you believe in," the congressman said.

Sestak, a former deputy chief of naval operations and first director of Deep Blue, the Navy’s anti-terrorism group, said that statement shows Weldon does not understand how the military functions.

"When you are given command of a combat force you are responsible and accountable for preparing those men and women for what this nation directs," he said. "If it is not morally reprehensible, it is your duty to do that. We cannot have a military that just walks away because they disagree on a policy or a judgment."

While Sestak said Iraq was "not a clear nor a present danger" because no weapons of mass destruction have been found, Weldon said he knows of four sites in Basra and Nasiriyah that have yet to be searched for biological or chemical weapons.

"I think the jury is still out on WMD," said Weldon, who also believes Saddam Hussein may have smuggled the weapons to Syria with Russian assistance prior to the March 2003 invasion.

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