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An inside look at a screwed-up war

By KIMBERLY DOZIER
July 26, 2010

U.S. soldier in Afghanistan (AP)

Shocking in scope if not in content, the leak of 91,000 classified U.S. records on the Afghanistan war by the whistle-blower website Wikileaks.org is one of the largest unauthorized disclosures in military history.

The documents cover much of what the public already knows about the troubled nine-year conflict: U.S. spec-ops forces have targeted militants without trial, Afghans have been killed by accident, and U.S. officials have been infuriated by alleged Pakistani intelligence cooperation with the very insurgent groups bent on killing Americans.

WikiLeaks posted the documents Sunday. The New York Times, London’s Guardian newspaper and the German weekly Der Spiegel were given early access to the records.

The release was instantly condemned by U.S. and Pakistani officials as both potentially harmful and irrelevant.

White House national security adviser Gen. Jim Jones said the release “put the lives of Americans and our partners at risk.” In a statement, he then took pains to point out that the documents describe a period from January 2004 to December 2009, mostly during the administration of President George W. Bush. And, Jones added, before President Obama announced a new strategy.

Pakistan’s Ambassador Husain Haqqani agreed, saying the documents “do not reflect the current on-ground realities,” in which his country and Washington are “jointly endeavoring to defeat al-Qaida and its Taliban allies.”

The U.S. and Pakistan assigned teams of analysts to read the records online to assess whether sources or locations were at risk.

The New York Times said the documents reveal that only a short time ago, there was far less harmony in U.S. and Pakistani exchanges.

The Times says the “raw intelligence assessments” by lower level military officers suggest that Pakistan “allows representatives of its spy service to meet directly with the Taliban in secret strategy sessions to organize networks of militant groups that fight against American soldiers in Afghanistan, and even hatch plots to assassinate Afghan leaders.”

The Guardian, however, interpreted the documents differently, saying they “fail to provide a convincing smoking gun” for complicity between the Pakistan intelligence services and the Taliban.

The leaked records include detailed descriptions of raids carried out by a secretive U.S. special operations unit called Task Force 373 against what U.S. officials considered high-value insurgent and terrorist targets. Some of the raids resulted in unintended killings of Afghan civilians, according to the documentation.

During the targeting and killing of Libyan fighter Abu Laith al-Libi, described in the documents as a senior al-Qaida military commander, the death tally was reported as six enemy fighters and seven noncombatants — all children.

Task Force 373 selected its targets from 2,000 senior Taliban and al-Qaida figures posted on a “kill or capture” list, known as JPEL, the Joint Prioritized Effects List, the Guardian said.

WikiLeaks said the release Sunday “did not generally include top-secret organizations,” and that it had “delayed the release of some 15,000 reports” as part of what it called “a harm minimization process demanded by our source,” but said it would release the documents later, possibly with material redacted.

U.S. government agencies have been bracing for a deluge of thousands more classified documents since the leak of helicopter cockpit video of a 2007 firefight in Baghdad. That was blamed on a U.S. Army intelligence analyst, Spc. Bradley Manning, 22, of Potomac, Md. He was charged with releasing classified information earlier this month. Manning had bragged on line that he downloaded 260,000 classified U.S. cables and transmitted them to Wikileaks.org.

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Associated Press writers Kirsten Grieshaber in Berlin and Robert Burns in Washington contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press

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2 Responses to An inside look at a screwed-up war

  1. Carl Nemo

    July 26, 2010 at 11:14 am

    “Task Force 373 selected its targets from 2,000 senior Taliban and al-Qaida figures posted on a “kill or capture” list, known as JPEL, the Joint Prioritized Effects List, the Guardian said.” …extract from article

    What are we to do in the future when the Feds form Task Force 666 to target U.S. citizens, putting them on a “kill or capture list”. Think it can’t happen, then people best think again… : |

    Our U.S. military has degenerated into simply a SWAT team that’s been green-lighted to kick any nation’s door, especially that of the “Third world” in an endless fight against planetary malcontents, aka as “terrorists” as tagged by these entrenched, corrupt statists in D.C.

    The recently released documents represent just the tip of the iceberg concerning the core rot surrounding our offshore adventurism, all for the benefit of the MIC. They have an endless supply of grossly overpriced “killtoys” in their inventory all earmarked to be sold to already broken U.S. tax debtors.

    Carl Nemo **==

  2. oh please

    July 29, 2010 at 9:34 am

    if you want to blame a screw up blame all those GW Dick supporters that said we need more of these deadbeats and voted a second time. they underfunded and allowed the talliban to get strong with their stupid “lets start another war” crap. taking their eyes off the Ball. If you all want to talk impeachment talk about them old farts