Bitter partisanship drives Evan Bayh from Senate

Democratic Senator Evan Bayh says he’s had enough of the bitter partisanship that defines government in Washington so he’s quitting his Senate seat after just two terms.

“My passion for helping people is not highly valued in Congress,” said in announcing his decision Monday He added that he would prefer to be in an environment that thrives on “solutions not slogans, progress not politics.”

Bayh’s announcement stunned fellow Democrats and added more problems to a party that is losing ground in Congress just four years after gaining control of both the House and Senate.

Steel reeling from loss of the Massachusetts Senate seat once held by long Democratic icon Ted Kennedy and other political setbacks, the party of the donkey now faces a struggle to hold on to Bayh’s seat in a swing state.

Democratic insiders say Bayh’s decision spotlights the problem of serving in a national political system today.

“It’s not like going to work every day, it’s like going to war,” former congressman Dave Nagle, now a political consultant, told The Associated Press. “You can only hear the bugle on the Hill so many times, then you grow tired of it. It just isn’t worth it.”

 

 

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7 Responses to "Bitter partisanship drives Evan Bayh from Senate"

  1. byreen  February 16, 2010 at 8:15 am

    Trying not to be cynical and take the man at his word is difficult if not impossible when considering their dubious conduct while in office that later comes to light as politicians retire early to the private sector.

    Could this be the one honest man in Washington or another running dog trying to outdistance past indiscretions, the FBI, and the Fox mews smear machine?

    He’s set for life, why should he care about those he swore to represent?

  2. griff  February 16, 2010 at 9:53 am

    Oh the poor senator! It’s such a tough slog helping people these days. What ever will we do without your voting yea on just about every expansion of federal power that passed through the Senate?

    You’ve really helped us enough, thanks.

  3. Warren  February 16, 2010 at 12:01 pm

    Many who first run for office do so out of some feeling of altruism and not primarily for personal gain. It’s what happens once they’re in office that’s disturbing. Seems that the influences of corruption are exceedingly powerful.

    —W—

  4. bogofree  February 16, 2010 at 12:39 pm

    This political dope slap was directed right at leadership. The moonbat element has taken control and what better way to make a statement than a last minute withdrawal giving the Republicans an excellent shot at that seat. Obama can’t control Pelosi and Reid since he is one of them.

  5. bryan mcclellan  February 16, 2010 at 8:16 pm

    Another Turd, trying to swim the wrong way right..

  6. dtotire  February 17, 2010 at 9:52 am

    I think the passage of the 17th amendment was a mistake. Prior to this, Senators appointed by State legislatures tended to be statesmen. By electing Senators by popular votes made the elections more costly, and many of those elected are political hacks, dependent on political contributions from special interests, and are highly partisan. If the 17th was repealed, we could make some provision for popular input, and have stronger requirements, such as having held popular office for a certain period. This could be an appointed office, such as a Cabinet position at the State or Federal level.

  7. AustinRanter  February 17, 2010 at 12:35 pm

    No big surprise. We’ll see more and more Congressional members jumping ship.

    Their tenure in Congress has been an OJT for lobbyists jobs.

    There are about 240 ex-Congressional members now working as lobbyists. Let’s face it, who is better in touch with how the system works and who’s on the take for what special interest?

    Nearly all politicians have bailed on the American people soon after taking office once they begin acquiring power and substantial personal gains.

    They abandon their Consititional Oath…while extorting the taxpayers and sucking up as much as they can from special perks from Corp/Lobbyists. They do it right in front of our eyes, yet we continue to pay them.

    So, now “We The People”, mixing in the take from special interest/lobbyists, just don’t provide or offer them enough to meet politicians’ living standards.

    They want more…and can get more by deserting their quest to serve their country. They want to become a part of the most profitable business ever.

    These parasites want to go back to Congress for the purpose of luring seated Congressional members into accepting significant favors in exchange for beneficial votes to further the best interest of themselves and those they represent…over that of the country’s.

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