The return of ‘malaise’

Former President Jimmy Carter called the mood of the country “malaise” during his one-term Presidency and that term came to define his four years in office and contributed to his failure to win re-election.

When you look at the mood of the nation today, you find a lot of similarities to the malaise of Carter’s day.

There’s no doubt we live in depressed, sour times. The mood of the nation is — at best — somber. Americans die in wars fought more for political agendas than national interest. Nearly five million homeowners in this country owe more on their mortgages than their home is worth. Millions lost their jobs and hundreds of thousands join their ranks every month.

More and more Americans cannot afford health insurance. Growing numbers face life on food stamps and welfare for the first time in their lives.

Much of the nation is currently gripped in the bitterest winter in many years. Record snowfalls fell on many areas and the talking heads on the tube say more is on the way.

Psychiatrists even have a disorder for the wintertime blues: It’s called “Seasonal Affected Disorder” or “SAD,” an appropriate acronym.

Karen Minty, writing on YourHealth.Com, says “the cloudy sky, strong winds and frigid air is enough to cool off anyone’s fire for life.”

You got that right Karen but causes of our winter is discontent goes far beyond the snow, the ice and the cold.

America is not just down. She may be close to a full count of out cold. The Democrats who swept into power with so many promises of hope and change couldn’t accomplish their legislative agenda even with veto-proof majorities in the House and Senate and one of their own in the White House.

Angry, dissatisfied voters have turned against President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party and appear willing to take yet another chance on Republicans. Independents desert Obama daily.

Sadly, past experience has shown us that simply replacing one political party with another can’t solve the nation’s woes. The system itself is broken but fixing that break may be impossible when the very people who benefit from the current system are the only ones who can make the change.

Which leaves the questions: Has our current system of government become unmanageable? Is is possible to change when the system itself prevents any real change? Can change happen without scrapping our current system of government?

And, finally, can America be saved?

I don’t have the answers.

Do you?

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