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McCain: Obama didn’t practice bipartisanship

By
February 16, 2009

Sen. John McCain says President Barack Obama failed to include Republicans in writing the big economic stimulus bill.

The Arizona Republican says the $787 billion measure will create what he calls "generational theft" — huge federal deficits for years to come.

McCain, who lost the presidential race to Obama, says the president is backtracking on promises of bipartisanship. McCain is not happy with the process that led to passage of the stimulus bill. He calls it a bad beginning to Obama’s presidency.

McCain acknowledges that Republicans excluded Democrats when the GOP held power on Capitol Hill. But he says Obama had promised to work differently.

McCain offers this advice: "Let’s start over now and sit down together."

He appeared Sunday on CNN’s "State of the Union."

18 Responses to McCain: Obama didn’t practice bipartisanship

  1. adb8917

    February 17, 2009 at 12:06 pm

    Some years back, before the 2006 races, a pundit — Mark Russell I believe — observed that the Democrats were starting to show some strength, and on a significant vote where in the past they’d rolled over, they stood together as a bloc and repudiated the GOP. (I don’t remember the bill, unfortunately…) But what did stick was the comment that the Democrats had bitten the hand that had slapped them in the face! Yeah, payback’s a bitch!

    What I don’t get is why the mainstream media (MSM) continues to give these thoroughly discredited mutts and their failed ideology headline space; especially since it’s a bunch of retread rhetoric. (I do, really. It’s not about journalism. It’s about unregulated profitability, and who offers these corporate free-booters a ride on Easy Street…)

    The Republican Party had 14 years of Congressional control, and 8 years concurrently in the White House, and THEY RAN THIS COUNTRY INTO THE GROUND! Barack Obama and a Democratic Congress are going to have to spend years undoing the damage that the GOP has visited on the American people and global economies. Our children and their children will be paying for these REPUBLICAN crimes for generations to come.

    So, unless and until the GOP does more than whine and complain they they’re being sidelined; until they acknowledge that this financial catastrophe occurred on their watch; unless they admit that bipartisanship was sacrificed by their own ideologically driven and malicious lust for power and privilege; and until they find new ideas that are genuinely centrist and in the people’s best interest, then I say let ‘em stew in their own juice! Keep them on the back bench; muzzle ‘em; steamroller them on every aspect of their chosen causes, and do business with the few, more rational ones like Collins, Snowe, and Specter.

    I suspect that moderate members of the House GOP Caucus might soon find some testicular fortitude and break ranks with the ideologues that have held them in thrall since the days of Newt Gingrich and Tom Delay (And why isn’t he already in jail?)

    Pragmatic politics will soon have them working a more accommodating line; but until that happens I say that we ought to hasten the extinction of these dinosaurs, and clean ‘em out of the political gene pool!

    ADB

  2. buckethead

    February 17, 2009 at 2:54 pm

    I used to think he was a reasonable man until I learned more about him. Screw him and MOVE ON!!!!

  3. spartacus

    February 17, 2009 at 3:24 pm

    Why is anyone listening to John McCain about the economy anyway? He has ZERO credibility on the subject, which he proved time and time again on the campaign trail, when the stock market took a nosedive, and when the stimulus package was being debated, when he offered an alternative bill, which consisted of nothing but tax cuts primarily benefitting those who ALWAYS benefit from Republican tax cuts (hint: they aren’t the middle class nor the lower classes). McCain is a joke.

    He’s also a liar. Actually, every Republican who’s been singing this tune about Democrats not offering them a seat at the table are LIARS. What they don’t like is that their ‘ideas’ weren’t put SOLELY into the bill, since all they wanted was tax cuts. There were a few, of course, who complained that there weren’t enough infrastructure dollars in the bill (which had been removed because they always label it PORK); when more money was put in, with NO designation for any specific projects in mind, they still labelled it pork. Apparently, they only like it if they can complain that it’s nonexistant. McCain even gave a long list the morning of the final vote of things he called ‘pork’ and not stimulus, which was funny, considering that each of them had a pretty good case for being there. He especially belittled a water project involving Mississippi and Louisiana, which anyone with half a brain knew involved the levees: however, since John McCain has less than half a brain, the urgency and need for such a program, and the stimulus in a region in need of employment after a hurricane’s devestation, apparently escaped him. Go figure.

    Every time McCain opens his mouth he proves that this country escaped a bazooka when it failed to elect him president in November. Imagine the disaster we’d be in if that clueless dolt were in the White House now: it would be worse than reelecting Hoover in 1932.

  4. storky

    February 16, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Liar!

    Obama bent over backwards to invite Republicans into meetings and events. Going so far as to request legislation that ordinarily would draw Republican support. Ultimately, it was the Republicans who established a unified front of unqualified resistance and non-cooperation.

    Screw those whiny-ass Republican cry-babies! They deserve to go the way of the Whigs.

  5. AustinRanter

    February 16, 2009 at 1:32 pm

    Storky…I don’t disagree with you for the most part. But it’s possible that the reckoning and revenge game started when Obama called in all of the leaders from both party…and one the Republican members was bitching about something and then….Obama looked at the guy and said something like, Hey, we won, so knock off your b.s.!(paraphrasing of course).

    That was the grandest door opener for the Republicans, who on November 4th had already decided that a war was on.

  6. JerryG

    February 16, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    Senator John McCain is a liar. He’s a bitter, aging and creaking politician. He was never a statesmen in the classic sense of the word. His true colors are ablaze in his artificial soft tone as he rhetorically lambastes Obama. At the true heart of his protestations is the desire to preserve his legacy and to prevent himself from slipping into political obscurity which, by the way, is inevitable!

  7. AustinRanter

    February 16, 2009 at 3:07 pm

    But, Jerry…

    I can’t at all dispute that McCain is a liar. He’s one of the last standing old regime political mob bosses. My questions are:

    The man keeps getting re-elected, year after year after year! Why?

    McCain isn’t the only old established incumbent. Why the hell are they still in office?

    What does this tell us about ourselves…you know, the electorates?

  8. Janice

    February 16, 2009 at 2:37 pm

    Before the Republican ideas are included in any legislation, they will have to come up with some good ones. And, as the last 15 years have proven, they don’t have any.

    If you tell the truth you don’t have to remember anything.
    Mark Twain

  9. storky

    February 16, 2009 at 4:55 pm

    If I had a Republican block
    I’d cut taxes in the morning
    I’d cat taxes in the evening
    all over this land
    I’d cut taxes on danger
    I’d cut taxes on warning
    I’d cut taxes on love between the brothers and the sister
    all over this land . . .

  10. woody188

    February 16, 2009 at 4:52 pm

    As I understand it, it was Pelosi and Reid that kept the Republicans out of the committees as a sort of payback for the Republicans doing the exact same thing to them from 1998 to 2006. They ignored Obama on bi-partisanship just like they ignored him on keeping the pork out of the stimulus package.

    McCain is just spewing Republican sound bites to lay the foundation for winning the Presidency in 2012. It’s all part of the non-stop election strategy Republicans have been employing since 2000 and should be ignored as such.

  11. Carl Nemo

    February 16, 2009 at 6:44 pm

    I agree woody188 about Pelosi and Reid playing games with the Republicans. In fact if Obama doesn’t somehow achieve a shorter leash on both Pelosi and Reid he’s going to realize in short order that those two will be instrumental in destroying his ability to deliver on 90 percent of his campaign promises at least in a clearly defined fashion. They will continually muck up the legislation, turning it into a travesty upon which the Republicans can have a field day of never-ending, somewhat spot-on criticism. Both Pelosi and Reid are legislative disasters in action.

    Carl Nemo **==

  12. Carl Nemo

    February 16, 2009 at 6:46 pm

    duplicate post deleted

  13. storky

    February 16, 2009 at 9:08 pm

    Actually, I recall the Republicans claiming to have a better plan . . . continue the repeated tax cuts that worked so effectively in fending off the economic nightmare. Rather than cooperate with House and Senate leaders, they thought they’d be more clever by repeating the failed policies of cutting taxes and lying.

    There wasn’t a hint of good-faith bargaining from the Republicans at anytime during the process.

  14. acf

    February 17, 2009 at 12:09 am

    You may very well be right about Pelosi and Reid. It’s awfully hard to resist giving payback after being kept out in the cold and kicked when you were down. As far as McCain laying groundwork for another run in 2012, he would have to get the nomination first. I don’t see the party giving it to him after the way he ran things this time around. Also, the same stuff he was spouting for his economic plans was the same as Bush pushed for 8 years, and was roundly refuted in the election, both for him and his party. The voters said ‘no more, we want a new direction’. Continuing to push the same ideas after that defeat is not astute, to say the least.

  15. Warren

    February 17, 2009 at 9:20 pm

    Party A and Party B:

    Party A locks out Party B when they have the political advantage and can push through the pork that their constituents most favor. Party B does the same to Party A when they have the political advantage.

    This will go on as long as we maintain the ‘winner-take-all’ two-party system that we have. I’m beginning to think that parliamentary systems of government that force the formation of multiple-party coalitions may be more overall representative of the majority the constituents.

    —W—

  16. gazelle1929

    February 16, 2009 at 7:04 pm

    What’s a Republican’s favorite wines?

    Didn’t those Democrats learn anything about bipartisanship when we were in control and ignoring them? How can the voters do this to us?

  17. AustinRanter

    February 16, 2009 at 9:52 pm

    This little game of cat and mouse between the Pseudo Gambino and the Genovese families (AKA Republican and Democrat – Screw You Till You Drop Families) who run Capital Hill will just keep going and going until even the energizer bunny comes to a dead stop.

    And meanwhile during this little game of cat and mouse…the losers are?

    I bet I can name the winners…

  18. griff

    February 17, 2009 at 12:54 am

    Forget John and Cindy, who’s the brunette in the picture? I need to start watching TV again.

    Anyone that actually thought bipartisanship was even remotely possible after this last campaign, and these last sixteen years of the bitterest and nastiest, most petulent and petty, puke-inducing excuse for a political process, should go back to sleep. We’ll wake you when it’s over.