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Using rehab to try and rebuild a career and reputation

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October 5, 2006

Mark Foley, a Florida Republican who resigned from his congressional seat, entered an alcohol rehabilitation program this week after the disclosure that he sent sexual messages via computer to teenage boys working as congressional pages.

Following are politicians and celebrities who have recently entered rehabilitation programs after damaging scandals:

* September 2006 – U.S. Rep. Bob Ney, an Ohio Republican, checked into an alcohol treatment facility several days before agreeing to plead guilty to illegally accepting tens of thousands of dollars in trips, meals, drinks and tickets. "I have come to recognize that a dependence on alcohol has been a problem for me," Ney said in a statement, that added he was "not making any excuses." Ney is not seeking re-election.

* August 2006 – Actor Mel Gibson agreed to attend Alcoholics Anonymous meetings and enroll in an alcohol abuse program in pleading no contest to a drunken driving charge. Gibson earlier apologized for an anti-Semitic tirade when he was stopped for speeding in Malibu, saying "please know from my heart that I am not an anti-Semite … Hatred of any kind goes against my faith."

* May 2006 – U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy, a Rhode Island Democrat and member of the famous political family, sought treatment for an addiction to prescription painkillers after his late-night car crash into a Capitol Hill barricade. Kennedy said he had a long-term struggle with depression and addiction.

* April 2006 – Conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh was charged with fraudulently concealing information to obtain prescription drugs. Prosecutors agreed to drop the charge in exchange for his remaining in treatment for drug addiction and paying $30,000 to help cover costs of the investigation into his drug-buying activities.


© Reuters 2006. All Rights Reserved.

10 Responses to Using rehab to try and rebuild a career and reputation

  1. hydrocodone without a prescription

    October 16, 2006 at 11:41 pm

    hydrocodone without a prescription

  2. Eleanor

    October 5, 2006 at 5:35 pm

  3. Mule Pilot

    October 5, 2006 at 6:34 pm

  4. Doubtom

    October 5, 2006 at 6:36 pm

  5. doubtom

    October 5, 2006 at 6:52 pm

  6. hydrocodone without a prescription

    October 16, 2006 at 11:41 pm

  7. Eleanor

    October 5, 2006 at 5:35 pm

    So guess it makes him a drunken pedophile instead of just a pedophile? Whatever.

  8. Mule Pilot

    October 5, 2006 at 6:34 pm

    What I want to know is why hasn’t Foley been dragged out of rehab and thrown in the slammer? Let him dry out with Big Bubba as his cell-mate.

    There’s enough evidence of his predatory efforts out there to hold him on suspicion until a hearing is held.

    Screw his Congressional status being used to keep him out of the slammer.

  9. Doubtom

    October 5, 2006 at 6:36 pm

    Anyone care to guess how long before Foley finds jesus?

  10. doubtom

    October 5, 2006 at 6:52 pm

    Ever notice how there’s a general reluctance on the part of politicians to jump on an “esteemed colleague” when he’s discovered to be a scumbag? Don’t mistake this reluctance for collegiality; it has more to do with protecting themselves should their own sins be publicized.
    Remember they make the laws, so it’s only right that they should include a few to protect themselves from a furious if downright hypocritical public. So, we have fat-ass Hastert using one the favorite legal ploys on the Hill, that is to quickly assign an investigation and then claim that you “can’t comment on it while it’s under investigation”. Isn’t that nice?– and it gives him much needed breathing room while he ponders how to lie himself out of this one. Aren’t lawyers a sweet bunch of rogues? What a pack of whores!